Monthly Archives: August 2011

Bandung

This is slowly being forgotten and washed away from the childhood’s of little kids here in Singapore. When I was young enough to barely peep over the kitchen counter, this pink drink rocked my world. It’s called Bandung, pronounced as bahn-doong, not band-dung. I emphasis on how to say it right, but I’ve no idea what that word means, or what language it is either. I just know it’s happiness in a cup. So easy to make, so cheap, and yet incredibly satisfying. Especially since this sunny island never enjoys temperatures lower than 20ªC, you can savour this beverage all year round!

  • 3 tbsp rose syrup
  • 200ml water
  • 4 tbsp fresh milk
  • 5 cubes of ice
  1. Put the syrup in the glass first, then add water. Have a taste, to see if it’s sweet enough or too sweet for you. Tweak it accordingly with more rose syrup or more water. TIP! It should be slightly sweeter since you’re gonna be adding ice.
  2. Now add the ice and add the milk. TIP! Add the milk in small quantities, stopping when you think it’s getting too milky for your liking. Some people I know like their Bandung a sexy pink, as opposed to baby pink.

Happy days, cool afternoons.

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Sandwich: Toasted Fishcakes

Back when Mummy made breakfast for me to bring to school, I’d always be pleasantly surprised whenever it was toasted fishcake sandwiches. Even though she made it every Friday.

This concept of ‘fishcakes’ is really quite unique to Singapore. For some reason, it’s extremely difficult to find it even in other parts of Asia, not to mention Europe. Back in London, I’d only find it in Chinatown; what a tragedy.

In any case, if and when you get your hands on some ‘fishcake’, please treat yourself to a morning toasted fishcake sandwich. It will complete your day (and your life).

  • 1 piece of fishcake, halved and toasted
  • 2 slices of bread, white or wholemeal
  • 1 thumbsized knob of butter, halved

With a knob of butter and a hot toasty piece of fishcake wedged in each slice of bread, you’ve got one more thing to make your Friday brighter.

 


Red Wine & Oregano Beef Stew

Mummy was out at work today so I had to make lunch for the family. Here’s a great one-dish meal to have with fresh bread or rice.

Red Wine & Oregano Beef Stew 

Ingredients:

  • 250g minced beef, prepared with:
    • 1 tbsp of corn flour
    • 1 tsp of balsamic vinegar
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 knob of butter
  • 1 onion, peeled and diced
  • 1 carrot, peeled and diced
  • 1 potato, peeled and diced
  • half a green pepper, chopped
  • 1 red chilli, seeds removed and finely chopped
  • 2 cloves of garlic, peeled and minced
  • half mug of beef or vegetable stock
  • quarter mug of red wine
  • 2 tbsp of dark soy sauce
  • a pinch of dried oregano
  • sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • a pinch of fresh coriander leaves

Cooking:

  1. Put the oil and knob of butter into a hot wok. TIP! This is to prevent the butter from burning to brown.
  2. Add the onion and green pepper, and fry till they start to shrivel a little.
  3. Toss in the carrot and potato.
  4. Together with the garlic and chilli, wine and stock, get the minced beef in.
  5. Add the dark soy sauce too.
  6. Season generously with freshly ground black pepper, and just a little salt, according to taste.
  7. Don’t forget the pinch of dried oregano.
  8. Bring to a boil, place a lid on top and lower the heat to a simmer.
  9. Let it stay on the stove for 15 minutes, checking every 5 minutes or so that it doesn’t dry up. If it’s too dry for your liking, add water in small quantities till you get the consistency you want. Be sure to add salt if necessary.
  10. Serve with fresh coriander leaves on top.

Bovril Boogie

It’s past ten at night and I’m hungry. But too lazy to make an elaborate meal. The bottle of Bovril catches my attention when I open the cupboard door in the kitchen.

Oh yes, Bovril Pasta.

Remember, Marmite Power? This is a brilliant alternative.

  • 1 portion of pasta
  • 1 thumb-sized knob of butter
  • 2 shallots, sliced finely
  • 2 inches of carrot, sliced into small inch-long pieces
  • 1 small pinch of dried basil
  • 1 small pinch of ground coriander
  • 1 dash of black pepper
  • half tbsp of Bovril
  1. While the pasta is cooking away in a pot of water, melt the butter in a saucepan.
  2. Toss in the carrots and shallots, and cook till they’re done.
  3. Add in the basil, ground coriander and black pepper.
  4. Steal a ladle full of the water from the pasta pot and add to the saucepan.
  5. Stir in the Bovril and lower the heat. Let it simmer.
  6. Once the pasta is cooked till al dente, drain briefly and add to the sauce. Mix thoroughly and serve.
  7. If you’re greedy like me, have it with a slice of honey baked ham. Happy nights.

Pizza: Fishcake & Sweet Pea

Earlier this afternoon, my dad gently requested, with a clenched fist, that I make pizza for dinner. This is one of the four I made:

If you ever have time and you feel like making a pizza, please try this one out. Thin crust pizza with fishcake and sweet pea topping, it’s comfort food to the max.

Fishcake is something I sorely miss while in London, for some reason, they don’t have it at the supermarket. Only Chinatown stocks it. And oddly enough, further up north of England, my peers have it in almost every homecooked meal. Such is life.

Back to the Fishcake. It’s marvellous when toasted or barbecued. So when it’s on a pizza, baking away with a coupla parboiled sweet peas, the result is maximum comfort in satisfaction.

Please. Try it. Soon.