Monthly Archives: February 2012

Mushroom & Cheddar Quiche

This only requires one step.

One compound step:

  1. Using this recipe for the pastry, make a thick concoction of finely sliced mushrooms, a beaten egg, grated cheddar and some milk.

Easy as pie.

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Pork & Cumin Spaghetti

Asian-fried spaghetti of pork cubes, sugar snaps and egg, with cumin, oregano and chilli.

  1. The usual drill. Set the pasta away to boil in a pot.
  2. In a hot skillet and a little oil, fry minced garlic till fragrant.
  3. Toss in pork cubes and sugar snaps.
  4. Add in crushed cumin and oregano.
  5. When pork is almost done, move all to the side of the skillet. Add some oil in the pan and crack in an egg. Beat it erratically and let it cook in chunks.
  6. Toss in sliced chilli.
  7. Mix everything together and season well with freshly ground sea salt and black pepper.
  8. The pasta should be done by now. Drain and add to skillet. Stir everything together into a party of lovely colours.

Salmon, Chicory, Sprouts, Beet & Brie

(No space for full title above.)

Lemon salmon on oregano spaghetti with boiled carrots, blanched chicory and beansprouts, with beetroot and Brie.

  1. Set the pasta to boil and drain when done. Season with sea-salt. Then toss with a good lug of extra virgin olive oil and dried oregano leaves.
  2. Sear the fillet of salmon with a generous squeeze of lemon juice, till lovely and browned.
  3. Boil the carrots and blanch chicory and beansprouts briefly. (Note: chicory is bitter so a small quantity will suffice.)
  4. Serve with beetroot cubes and pinches of Brie.
  5. Garnish with carrot leaves.
Don’t those carrots look lovely?

Mushroom & Brie Bruschetta

As I’ve said many times before, Sunday mornings are times when you truly have the opportunity to make a good breakfast for yourself. Here’s what I had this morning – Mushroom and Brie Bruschetta (pronounced as [brusˈketːa]).

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  1. In a hot skillet, toss in sliced mushrooms with a small knob of butter.
  2. Add a small pinch of basil and season accordingly with freshly ground sea salt and black pepper.
  3. While that’s happening, toast your bread (preferably slices of a crusty loaf, but square slices work fine as well.)
  4. Once the mushrooms are just about browned nicely, add in a tiny bit of cream just to hold everything together, then turn the heat down low.
  5. The bread should be done, get it out. Half a clove of garlic and rub it on the toast.
  6. Spoon some mushrooms onto each slice and accompany with a small handful of fresh greens, holding them down with a small wedge of Brie.
  7. Serve with fresh cherry tomatoes, and without cutlery. All hands, all goodness.

Spicy Beef Fennel & Sage Goulash

Okay, I went a little ballistic with the ingredients in this one, but making a stew really is a good way to use up all those nearly-dead vegetables in your fridge. No prizes for guessing how fresh my veggies were.

  1. In a pot, toss together a knob of butter, smashed garlic, chopped fennel, diced carrots and potatoes, minced ginger, sliced chilli and a small stick of cinnamon. Fry everything till fragrant.
  2. Add in water to barely cover and bring to a boil.
  3. Meanwhile, marinate diced beef chunks with a bit of cornflour, red wine and balsamic vinegar and chopped chives. Then add to the pot as well.
  4. Dump in a dollop of cranberry sauce if you’ve got some, if not, a pinch of sugar will do.
  5. Crush in a small bunch of dried sage leaves and add a teaspoon of dark soy sauce.
  6. When beef is almost done, add about 2-3 mugs of meat or vegetable stock.
  7. Season well with salt and pepper and put the lid on. Turn the heat down to a simmer and leave it for 20-30 minutes.
  8. After 20-30 minutes, add in a splash of red wine.
  9. Make a mixture of cornflour and cold water. Then stir in the cornflour mixture a tablespoon at a time till it’s reached your desired thickness. Alternatively, you could blitz a quarter of the stew to thicken it.
  10. Have it with a toasty crusty bread roll.

Salmon, Mint, Fennel & Sour Pasta

Seared salmon with sauteed carrot and fennel, on linguine dressed with balsamic vinaigrette, served with a mint and garlic sauce.

  1. Set the linguine away to cook in a pot of boiling water. Drain once cooked, and toss in a balsamic vinaigrette.
  2. With a small knob of butter and a little splash of olive oil, saute the julienned carrot and fennel. Season with freshly ground black pepper and sea salt. Remove once vegetables are cooked.
  3. Prepare your salmon fillets, cutting them into small rectangular pieces. Salt the skin generously with seasalt and lay them skin side down on a piece of kitchen towel.
  4. Chop up a handful of mint leaves and mince it together with a small clove of garlic. Transfer to a mortar and pestle, add a little drizzle of good extra virgin olive oil and pound away till everything comes together as a sauce.
  5. As soon as the vegetables are out of the pan, sear the salmon fillets skin side down till golden. Flip the fillets after the skins are nicely browned, and remove once they are done. The pieces of salmon should be firm not hard, nor soft. Let them rest on a fresh piece of kitchen towel before plating up.

Honey Braised Pork Shoulder

Pork shoulder fillet braised in garlic, ginger and honey north of carrot and red chilli, served on wilted Chinese leaf.

  1. In a skillet with some water, make a broth of minced garlic, ginger, soy sauce, carrot and red chilli. When the water comes to a boil, incorporate about a tablespoon of honey, depending on how much broth you’ve made. Taste the broth, it should be a sweetish-salty flavour.
  2. Set in the fillet of pork and braise till done.
  3. When the pork is almost done, add in the Chinese leaf and remove all once cooked.