Category Archives: Asian

Soy Sauce Braised Chicken

The key to cooking chicken is to do it very slowly and gently. That way, the juices will all stay within and not lose itself to being a dry papery hunk of meat. Especially so here, the chicken has to be braised tenderly, so that as it cooks, it absorbs as much flavour from the broth as it possibly can, giving you an exquisitely fork-tender and succulent mouthful of poultry goodness.

This depends on how much chicken you’re making, but for about two people, here’s what to do:

  1. Into a good pot, toss two cloves of garlic, skinned on and smashed once, three cloves, two bits of star anise, a modest stick of cinnamon, a good dash of white pepper, a small pinch of whole black peppercorns, and a crack of sea salt.
  2. Also, add a teaspoon of pure sesame oil, two tablespoons of light soy sauce and one tablespoon of dark soy sauce.
  3. Place your chicken parts in and fill the pot with water, so that the poultry is just about half submerged. Turn the hob on to the lowest heat setting. Put the lid on leaving a small gap and let it simmer away gently for about an hour, or slightly longer.
  4. Toss in carrot batons and mushrooms in the last 5 minutes if you want, and adjust seasoning of broth with sea salt accordingly. If having with hot steamed rice, make sure it’s saltier than usual.

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Try this with pork belly.

 

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Instant Mee Pok

(deep breath)

It’s been a long long hiatus that I’ve taken. I blame Instagram. Grainy photos behind retro-esque filters and uninspired dishes. In any case, I’m hoping this entry won’t be like the last one – the last one for a long while.

So I guess from now, I’ll be using more than a couple of Instagramasised photograph. Fingers crossed that’ll work out well.

Alas! The first of the list is Instant Mee Pok! Mee Pok (translated from Chinese dialect as ‘thin noodles’) is a flat egg noodle used a lot in Singapore to make Fishball Noodles and Mushroom Minced Pork Noodles. They say the first creators of pasta were actually the Chinese; Italians apparently discovered it much later. In any case, Mee Pok is usually cooked fresh and unless you buy them fresh from the market or make them yourself, you won’t get a chance to have them this far from East Asia. But, but, BUT! I stumbled upon a pack of dried instant Mee Pok at Chinatown last week. Well, it isn’t quite exactly the same thing as its fresh counterpart, but I’d say it comes pretty damned close.

I am a happy boy.

(Follow me on Instagram @skinnynigel or #skinnynigel)


Asian Fish & Potatoes

There’s a reason fish and chips exists: the combination of fish and potatoes is quite a thing of marriage. In any case, like Haddock on Smash or Unbattered Pollock & Chips, this fish and potatoes recipe is very much asian – Battered spicy beancurd-marinated sutchi fillet on sesame mash of potatoes, carrots and white radish, with sweet gem lettuce and calamansi.

  1. Set peeled and sliced potatoes, carrot and radish away to boil. When done, drain and let it steam dry in the colander for about 5 minutes or so. Then, mash with a knob of butter, a splash of milk, salt, pepper and a few drops of sesame oil.
  2. Marinate the fish fillets with spicy beancurd and dust with self-raising flour. Be sure to pat dry the fillets before doing this. Deep fry till golden brown. Cool on a cooling rack laid with kitchen towel.
  3. Serve all together with fresh leaves of sweet gem lettuce and half a calamansi for squeezing. Golden brown fried sliced shallots with the mash is a HUGE bonus.

Leek & Pork Stirfry

This post should have been written months ago during the Lunar New Year season. Reason being this dish is always on the table at the annual family reunion dinner. ‘Leek’ in Mandarin is suan, which sounds just like the equivalent of the word ‘count’. In essence, it’s an auspicious dish to consume during the festival celebrating luck and prosperity. That aside, leek and pork is a lovely combination.

  1. Cut up the vegetable to thin slices, diagonally. Separating them to loose strands gently.
  2. Do the same with a carrot, or pass it through the coarse side of a grater.
  3. Prepare the pork this way.
  4. In a hot skillet with a tablespoon of vegetable oil, toss in minced garlic and fry till fragrant.
  5. Add in the vegetables and fry about with a small splash of water. Lower the heat.
  6. When the leek is almost completely softened, add in the pork.
  7. Turn up the heat and stirfry everything together by adding water in small quantities, frying till dry-ish each time.
  8. Adjust seasoning accordingly with light soy sauce.
  9. Serve with hot steamed rice.

Braised Leeks and Noodles in Mussel Liquor

 Mussel liquor is golden.

  1. Prepare the mussels, cleaning them of barnacles and beards.
  2. Steam the shellfish with a little bit of water, in a saucepan on medium-low heat. Remove when the mussels as they open and discard those that don’t.
  3. Add chopped leeks and tomatoes to the pan and braise slowly.
  4. Season with light soy sauce and white pepper powder, to taste.
  5. Cook noodles in a separate pot and strain once done.
  6. When leeks are beautifully braised to soft tenderness, toss in the noodles and mix well.
  7. Serve with the mussels on the side.

Sayur Lodeh

Right, so I’m absolutely terrible at following recipes because I always try to challenge my palette by estimating proportions of ingredients as opposed to licking the tried-and-tested quantities right off the spoon of a recipe list. The result: mild inconsistency and no record of numbers in teaspoons and measuring cups. No surprise with this recipe, all I’ve got is the list of ingredients.

Sayur Lodeh is essentially like a lovely savoury, coconutty, vegetable curry. Sayur means vegetables in Malay; no idea what lodeh is.

For the spice blend:

  • chilli paste
  • belachan (shrimp paste)
  • onions
  • garlic
  • lemon grass
  • dried shrimp
  • ginger
  • coriander powder
  • turmeric
  • cumin
  • chilli powder
  • vegetable oil

Other stuff:

  • water
  • coconut milk
  • cabbage
  • carrots
  • long beans
  • tofu
  1. To prepare the spice blend, in a mortar and pestle, or if you’re awesome and own a food processor, smash the aforementioned ingredients in, tasting as you go along until you get the taste spot on. You should be aiming for a concentrated mixture of the finished product. Make sure you have enough for the entire pot of stew you’re planning to make. As a gauge, it should be enough to coat the vegetables comfortably.
  2. In a pot with the vegetables and tofu, pour enough water to just submerge the veggies. Bring to a boil.
  3. Add the curry paste and mix.
  4. Let it boil away for 10 minutes or until the vegetables are soft, before turning the heat down to a simmer.
  5. Put the lid half on and let it simmer for 45 minutes. This will cause the curry to reduce a little, intensifying the flavours.
  6. Add coconut milk, and water if needed. Bring to the boil again before turning heat off.
  7. Adjust seasoning with salt accordingly.
  8. Serve with hot steamed rice or Fried Rice Noodles.

Oriental Fusilli Fry

Another one to add to the vegetarian recipe list, this is a great dish to whizz up if you wanna have both pasta and that salty Asian flavour.

  1. Usual drill, set your fusilli boiling away in a pot.
  2. In a hot skillet with a tablespoon of vegetable oil, toss in minced garlic and fry till fragrant.
  3. Add torn mushrooms and cubed hard-skin tofu, frying till golden.
  4. Tear in a handful of gem lettuce for the texture of sweet crunch. Turn of the heat.
  5. Drain pasta, and together with a small bit of pasta-cooking water, add to the skillet.
  6. Add a teaspoon of oyster sauce and mix up well.
  7. Season accordingly with soy sauce and white pepper powder.
  8. Plate up and garnish with finish sliced fresh chilli, and a small crack of black pepper.