Category Archives: Seafood

Braised Leeks and Noodles in Mussel Liquor

 Mussel liquor is golden.

  1. Prepare the mussels, cleaning them of barnacles and beards.
  2. Steam the shellfish with a little bit of water, in a saucepan on medium-low heat. Remove when the mussels as they open and discard those that don’t.
  3. Add chopped leeks and tomatoes to the pan and braise slowly.
  4. Season with light soy sauce and white pepper powder, to taste.
  5. Cook noodles in a separate pot and strain once done.
  6. When leeks are beautifully braised to soft tenderness, toss in the noodles and mix well.
  7. Serve with the mussels on the side.
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Salmon, Mushrooms & Aglio Olio

Seared fillet of salmon, on top of aglio olio with carrot, chives and mushrooms.

  1. Get the linguine boiling away in a pot of water.
  2. Meanwhile, cut carrots up to a brunoise, chop up some chives, quarter a couple of mushrooms and minced garlic.
  3. Toss a knob of butter into a hot skillet and once foaming subsides, toss in garlic, carrots and mushrooms.
  4. Once that’s done, move it to the side of the pan and sear the fillet of salmon, skin-side down. Flip and cook briefly when skin is crisp.
  5. Remove salmon as soon as its done, and let it rest while you drain the pasta.
  6. Add pasta to mushroom and carrot mixture. Toss in chives.
  7. Add basil and oregano, season with salt and pepper and drizzle with olive oil. Mix.
  8. Serve with a small squeeze of lemon.

I will never get sick of the basil-oregano combination.


Salmon, Mint, Fennel & Sour Pasta

Seared salmon with sauteed carrot and fennel, on linguine dressed with balsamic vinaigrette, served with a mint and garlic sauce.

  1. Set the linguine away to cook in a pot of boiling water. Drain once cooked, and toss in a balsamic vinaigrette.
  2. With a small knob of butter and a little splash of olive oil, saute the julienned carrot and fennel. Season with freshly ground black pepper and sea salt. Remove once vegetables are cooked.
  3. Prepare your salmon fillets, cutting them into small rectangular pieces. Salt the skin generously with seasalt and lay them skin side down on a piece of kitchen towel.
  4. Chop up a handful of mint leaves and mince it together with a small clove of garlic. Transfer to a mortar and pestle, add a little drizzle of good extra virgin olive oil and pound away till everything comes together as a sauce.
  5. As soon as the vegetables are out of the pan, sear the salmon fillets skin side down till golden. Flip the fillets after the skins are nicely browned, and remove once they are done. The pieces of salmon should be firm not hard, nor soft. Let them rest on a fresh piece of kitchen towel before plating up.

Salmon & Sage Pasta

 

Seared fillet of salmon on pasta with Chinese leaf, mushrooms, chilli and dried sage.

 

  1. Set pasta away to cook in a pot of salty boiling water.
  2. In a pan with a little bit of oil, sear the fillet of fish skin side down till just done. Set aside to rest.
  3. In the same pan, toss in minced garlic and fry till fragrant.
  4. Add in shredded Chinese leaf and quartered mushrooms.
  5. Crush in dried sage leaves and season well with freshly ground sea salt and black pepper.
  6. Add sliced chilli when vegetables and mushrooms are almost cooked.
  7. Drain spaghetti and mix together with the Chinese leaf and mushrooms well. Add a generous lug of good extra virgin olive oil to loosen everything up nice and smooth.
  8. Plate up and serve, boasting the skin of the salmon in its crisp golden glory.

It’s absolute melt-in-your-mouth heaven to indulge in a large nugget of fatty salmon meat, pan-seared to perfection and luxuriously devoured whole.


Mussels Provençal

Stepping away from the usual white wine with mussels, here’s a recipe for mussels in a red wine tomato sauce: Mussels Provençal with Mushrooms and Jerusalem Artichokes

Jerusalem artichokes

  1. Skin the Jerusalem artichokes and set them away to boil till soft.
  2. Mash or puree with some single cream and a small bit of butter.

 Mussels Provençal with Mushrooms

  1. After all the routine jazz of discarding lousy mussels, steam the mussels in a generous splash of red wine, with minced red onions, on an open skillet. Let the overpowering flavour of the alcohol evaporate before adding the rest of the ingredients, and putting the lid on.
  2. When the alcohol has more or less evaporated, toss in chopped tomatoes, minced garlic, quartered mushrooms. Also, add in some tomato juice or diluted tomato puree mixture, then turn down the heat and put the lid on.
  3. Once the mixture has reduced, add in a knob of butter to finish the sauce.

Garnish with a pinch of fennel leaves.


Butter Salmon, Fondant Potato, Fennel Salsa

Butter-roasted fillet of crisp-skin salmon, a fondant potato, on a bed of fennel and carrot salsa, with fresh arugula, seared cherry tomatoes and a slice of lemon.

Salmon

  1. In a skillet, continuously baste the fillet of fish with foaming butter.
  2. When done, rest on kitchen towel.
  3. Peel off the skin of the salmon and dry-fry it.

Fondant Potato

  1. Sear the potato in a small pot of butter, till brown. Repeat on the other side.
  2. Add a bit of stock to boil it once the potato has been browned on both sides. Potato is done once it can be easily pierced through its side.

Fennel and Carrot Salsa

  1. With a teaspoon of vegetable oil in a skillet, fry minced shallots till transparent.
  2. Toss in chopped carrots and fennel.
  3. Add in a small bowl of tomato juice and reduce.
  4. Season accordingly.

Serve with fresh arugula, seared cherry tomatoes and a slice of lemon.


Simple Butter Mussels

Mussels are apparently the poor man’s food of shellfish, cheap and easily available. I haven’t had them in awhile and tonight, I made a little bit of it with some pasta.

So far, the best way I know to do mussels is to steam them. And contrary to popular belief, Sarah read somewhere that all properly-cooked mussels can be eaten, whether or not they open during the cooking process. No clue how true that is though.

Disclaimer: Consume unopened cooked mussels AT YOUR OWN RISK.

Simple Butter Mussels

  1. Bring a pot with water about half a centimetre deep to the boil.
  2. Toss the clean scrubbed mussels in and add a splash of dry white wine. Then, put the lid on. Mussels cook really quickly so keep them in check.
  3. Remove cooked-open mussels to a bowl at once. After about a maximum of 8 minutes, remove all.
  4. DO NOT throw the remaining mussel liquor away! Melt in a small knob of salted butter and drizzle over the bowl of cooked shellfish.
  5. Sneak a happy smile, or shed happy tears.

Mussels are lovely with garlic and a little bit of chilli. So I think Aglio Olio is the perfect carbohydrate match.

Simple cooking, at it’s best.