Tag Archives: Asian

Honey Braised Pork Shoulder

Pork shoulder fillet braised in garlic, ginger and honey north of carrot and red chilli, served on wilted Chinese leaf.

  1. In a skillet with some water, make a broth of minced garlic, ginger, soy sauce, carrot and red chilli. When the water comes to a boil, incorporate about a tablespoon of honey, depending on how much broth you’ve made. Taste the broth, it should be a sweetish-salty flavour.
  2. Set in the fillet of pork and braise till done.
  3. When the pork is almost done, add in the Chinese leaf and remove all once cooked.
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Black Hokkien Mee

This is the Kuala Lumpur variant of Fried Hokkien Prawn Noodles, similar to the usual Chinese Stir-Fry, but going crazy with the rendered lard and dark soy sauce, the darker the better.

  1. Get your noodles, or linguine boiling in a pot and have your ingredients all ready. Drain your noodles or pasta as soon as they’re done. This is important ‘cos stir-frying is a whizz, no time for chopping carrots while your garlic is burning away into a pile of charred lumps.
  2. In a screaming hot wok of a tablespoon of oil, get your slices of Chinese sausage, or lardons in.
  3. Add minced garlic, minced onion and a slice of ginger into the wok to flavour the oil.
  4. Welcome the Aroma Fairies.
  5. Carrots go in ‘cos they take longer to cook through.
  6. Once your carrots are almost done, add a small bit of oil and crack in a egg, stirring it about erratically till about done.
  7. Then, add in your marinated (minus soy sauce) Melt-In-Your-Mouth Pork, stir-frying it with small quantities of the noodle boiling water.
  8. Toss in leafy green vegetables and drained noodles.
  9. Go crazy with the dark soy sauce till it’s all nice and blackish. (Bear in mind that doing this can get VERY salty, so the darker the soy sauce, the better.)
  10. Season with light soy sauce if necessary.
  11. Add a generous pinch of sugar and still happily away.

Tom Yum Fish Spaghetti

Frozen fish is an sufficient alternative if you haven’t got fresh fish. However, cooking frozen fish can be a tricky task; when done wrongly, the fish can be real dry, and gross. A good way to do it I’d say, is to baste it continuously in the accompanying sauce.

In this case, I’ve done a mild tom yum sauce, with carrots, shallots, garlic, a slice of ginger and a squeeze of lemon. If you’re wondering, the tom yum base was from an instant paste in a bottle just like this one:

  1. Set the pasta away in a pot to boil together with a handful of frozen peas. Boiling the peas instead of sauteing them allows them a fresher flavour and sweeter crunch.
  2. I made the sauce by tossing the chopped condiments (mentioned above) together into a skillet, and adding a teaspoon of tom yum paste and an adequate amount of pasta-cooking water.
  3. Then, I cooked the fish, drenching it repeatedly in the sweet yet just sourish gravy. Nonstop, till the fish was just right.
  4. Drained the pasta and peas and served with a chilli garnish, for colour and added heat.

Kinda like an Asian bolognese, slightly spicy, and with fish. Lush.

Click here for the original Tom Yum Spaghetti recipe.


Ballotine of Pork & Shrimps

I confess, I am currently obsessed with the ballotine. Rolling meat into a tight bundle and then cooking it makes me happy. It doesn’t help that there is such a sense of excitement when the time is nigh to slice it.

Alright, so maybe pork isn’t so appetising in a ballotine. In any case, a drizzle of sesame oil elevates its flavour immensely. Served with ultra-thin rice noodles, carrot mash and seared lettuce, I am definitely playing with my food.

French-style cooking and Asian flavours, at its best.


Vinegar Braised Haddock

I got tired of having fish and potatoes every Friday, so I made a little asian fish stew last night. Mummy used to make it for dinner some Fridays, before we succumbed to the convenience of dining out on the night before the weekend. It’s pleasantly bold, yet ever-so-slightly sour. Braised slowly but surely, in a mildly sweet garlicky dark sauce, the fish sings beautifully with the shrimps. The tomatoes, mushrooms and spinach leaves tosses up a party of textures. Chowed down with extra hot finger chilli and freshly steamed basmati.

  • 1 fillet haddock, defrosted completely, cut into large chunks
  • 1 tomato, cut into wedges
  • 1 brown mushroom, sliced
  • 1 white mushroom, sliced
  • 1 handful shrimps
  • 2 slices ginger
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 3 tablespoon black vinegar
  • 2 tablespoon light soy sauce
  • 2 teaspoon dark soy sauce
  • 1 pinch sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon sesame oil
  • 1/2  mug water
  • sea salt, to taste
  • 1 handful baby spinach leaves

 •••

  1. Get the sauce done first. With a little oil in the pan, in goes the garlic and ginger.
  2. When fragrant, get the shrimps, tomatoes and mushrooms in.
  3. Then, the vinegar, soy sauces, sugar and sesame oil.
  4. Add water to add more volume to sauce. Adjust with sea salt accordingly.
  5. Finally, when the sauce has reduced slightly, turn the heat down to s simmer and sit the fish pieces gently inside. Baste it well, and flip carefully when it’s half cooked.
  6. Once the fish is done, turn off the heat.
  7. Serve atop the baby spinach leaves.

No points for presentation there, but all smiles for the flavour.


Pork Belly in Chinese Gravy

Ingredients

  • 200g pork belly, thinly sliced,

marinated with:

  • 1 tbsp cornflour
  • 2 tsp sesame oil
  • 1 tbsp light soy sauce
  • 1 tsp freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 dash white pepper powder

*****

  • half a bulb garlic, minced
  • 2 inches of a large carrot, cut into small inch-long pieces
  • 1 tbsp vegetable oil
  • 3 tbsp dark soy sauce
  • salt
  • 300ml water
  • a pinch of fresh coriander leaves, chopped

Preparation and Cooking

  1. Marinade the pork belly and prepare the carrot and garlic.
  2. In a hot wok with the vegetable oil, fry the garlic till fragrant.
  3. Toss in the carrot and fry till almost done.
  4. Put in the marinaded pork belly and stir about, adding water in small quantities, adding each time the wok gets dry.
  5. When the meat is about done, add all the remaining water at a go to form a gravy.
  6. Add dark soy sauce, and salt to taste.
  7. When it starts to boil, turn down the heat to a simmer for approximately  15 minutes, longer if you want the pork to be even more tender, and if your stomach can wait.
  8. Serve with fresh coriander.

You can have this with steamed rice or Mini Yorkshire Puddings. Delish.


Yorkshire Paradise

It’s tragic how I had my first Yorkshire Pudding only when I came to London some months back. It was about the size of my palm, and carried a scoopful of lovely roast beef, white onions and gravy. Definitely love at first bite. I always thought they were difficult to make until I came across Jamie’s Oliver’s Mini Yorkies recipe. Literally, a piece of cake.

Long story short, the versatile Yorkshire Puddings or Mini Yorkies: with a couple of tweaks, and some true advice from Yorkshireman Niall, here’s how I like mine done:

  • 1 large egg
  • half a mug of plain flour
  • half a mug of fresh milk
  1. Into a shallow 12-hole muffin tray, liberally drizzle olive oil in one swift motion, from hole to hole without stopping. Stick into the oven and preheat to 180°C on the top rack. While that’s in there, prepare your pudding mix. It’s real similar to pancakes, so pay attention.
  2. Get the ingredients in a big bowl and mix away, till smooth.
  3. When the oil’s all hot (and maybe bubbly), get the tray out. Then, with the pudding mix, fill each hole to about half, give or take. At this stage, you’d be horrified to see the rings of oil surrounding the pudding mixture. Don’t worry, it beats using butter, hands down. (The amount should be just about right for 12 holes. Work out everything else in between.) Don’t take too long or the tray will cool down. Chuck it back into the oven for about 15 minutes.
  4. In the meantime, you can prepare a beef gravy or whatever you fancy in a yorkshire pudding. Personally, I think yorkies were created to caress beef.
  5. Keep an eye on them yorkies and you’ll see that they rise beautifully at the sides first, forming a little well of goodness. Done till golden. Brilliant. It’s plain physics, or so Sarah explains. If you forget to preheat the tray and oil till hot, the sides won’t rise.

This is what you’ll get:

I had this with a pork belly stew. More on that here.

******

A coupla months back, here’s how I had them:

After I’d gotten them out of the oven and out of the tray, this is what I stuck into each hole, and back into the heat:

  • a slice of tomato, as the base.
  • beef mince, marinated the way I like, with thyme and sage.
  • half rings of white onion.
  • cheddar, as the ‘glue’.

When the toppings were ready, on a chopping board, I plopped them onto the individual yorkies. Then, top off finally with a couple of leaves of arugula and a sprinkle of paprika.

With a snack looking this delish, you’d be a fool not to smile. (: