Tag Archives: Belly

Pork Belly in Chinese Gravy

Ingredients

  • 200g pork belly, thinly sliced,

marinated with:

  • 1 tbsp cornflour
  • 2 tsp sesame oil
  • 1 tbsp light soy sauce
  • 1 tsp freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 dash white pepper powder

*****

  • half a bulb garlic, minced
  • 2 inches of a large carrot, cut into small inch-long pieces
  • 1 tbsp vegetable oil
  • 3 tbsp dark soy sauce
  • salt
  • 300ml water
  • a pinch of fresh coriander leaves, chopped

Preparation and Cooking

  1. Marinade the pork belly and prepare the carrot and garlic.
  2. In a hot wok with the vegetable oil, fry the garlic till fragrant.
  3. Toss in the carrot and fry till almost done.
  4. Put in the marinaded pork belly and stir about, adding water in small quantities, adding each time the wok gets dry.
  5. When the meat is about done, add all the remaining water at a go to form a gravy.
  6. Add dark soy sauce, and salt to taste.
  7. When it starts to boil, turn down the heat to a simmer for approximately  15 minutes, longer if you want the pork to be even more tender, and if your stomach can wait.
  8. Serve with fresh coriander.

You can have this with steamed rice or Mini Yorkshire Puddings. Delish.

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Yorkshire Paradise

It’s tragic how I had my first Yorkshire Pudding only when I came to London some months back. It was about the size of my palm, and carried a scoopful of lovely roast beef, white onions and gravy. Definitely love at first bite. I always thought they were difficult to make until I came across Jamie’s Oliver’s Mini Yorkies recipe. Literally, a piece of cake.

Long story short, the versatile Yorkshire Puddings or Mini Yorkies: with a couple of tweaks, and some true advice from Yorkshireman Niall, here’s how I like mine done:

  • 1 large egg
  • half a mug of plain flour
  • half a mug of fresh milk
  1. Into a shallow 12-hole muffin tray, liberally drizzle olive oil in one swift motion, from hole to hole without stopping. Stick into the oven and preheat to 180°C on the top rack. While that’s in there, prepare your pudding mix. It’s real similar to pancakes, so pay attention.
  2. Get the ingredients in a big bowl and mix away, till smooth.
  3. When the oil’s all hot (and maybe bubbly), get the tray out. Then, with the pudding mix, fill each hole to about half, give or take. At this stage, you’d be horrified to see the rings of oil surrounding the pudding mixture. Don’t worry, it beats using butter, hands down. (The amount should be just about right for 12 holes. Work out everything else in between.) Don’t take too long or the tray will cool down. Chuck it back into the oven for about 15 minutes.
  4. In the meantime, you can prepare a beef gravy or whatever you fancy in a yorkshire pudding. Personally, I think yorkies were created to caress beef.
  5. Keep an eye on them yorkies and you’ll see that they rise beautifully at the sides first, forming a little well of goodness. Done till golden. Brilliant. It’s plain physics, or so Sarah explains. If you forget to preheat the tray and oil till hot, the sides won’t rise.

This is what you’ll get:

I had this with a pork belly stew. More on that here.

******

A coupla months back, here’s how I had them:

After I’d gotten them out of the oven and out of the tray, this is what I stuck into each hole, and back into the heat:

  • a slice of tomato, as the base.
  • beef mince, marinated the way I like, with thyme and sage.
  • half rings of white onion.
  • cheddar, as the ‘glue’.

When the toppings were ready, on a chopping board, I plopped them onto the individual yorkies. Then, top off finally with a couple of leaves of arugula and a sprinkle of paprika.

With a snack looking this delish, you’d be a fool not to smile. (:


Fried Hokkien Prawn Mee

It’s been a while since I’ve been back to Singapore, and aside from many other things, I miss the food there. I thought I was dealing fine with the abstinence of Singaporean cuisine, until I was reminded of my beloved Fried Hokkien Prawn Mee. My stomach grumbled to the rhythm of the words as they entered my ears. No, I’m not talking about the black sauce variant from Kuala Lumpur.

I’m talking about this:

 

It’s far from anything you’d get in the hawker centres back in Singapore, but it’ll do. Craving, momentarily satisfied.

What you’ll need:

  • Fresh yellow egg noodles
  • Fresh white rice noodles
  • Whole prawns, heads and shell on
  • Squid
  • Pork belly
  • Eggs
  • Chives
  • Beansprouts
  • Garlic
  • Lime
  • Pork lardons (optional)
Preparation:
Prawn Soup Stock
  1. Before you get down to frying the noodles, you gotta have the prawn soup stock ready. Here’s how I did mine. Peel and shell the prawns, then cut the squid into rings. Into a pot, dump the prawn peelings and heads. Also, in goes the peeled prawns, squid and pork belly. Here, I like adding a couple of smashed garlic cloves too. Then fill the pot with boiling water so that there’s just enough to cover what’s inside. Let it boil away before turning it down to a simmer. Season with salt and pepper, so it eventually becomes a peppery and tasty almost-thick sort of soup.
  2. Keep a check on the peeled prawns, squid and pork belly. Once they’re just cooked, fish them out. Slice the pork belly thinly and set all aside.
Fried Prawn Noodles
  1. In a screaming hot wok, drizzle some oil.
  2. This next step is strictly optional. Fry bit of pork lardons and remove when brown and crispy. Leave the rendered fat in the wok. It is liquid gold.
  3. Then, in goes an egg. Erratically break and beat it as it cooks.
  4. Before the egg gets proper fried, toss in the noodles, both yellow and white. Add a ladle-full of that awesome prawn soup stock you made earlier. This will soften the noodles. Stir till there is no more soup left in the wok.
  5. Toss in the beansprouts and stir about.
  6. Then, add another ladle-full of the soup stock and cover the wok for at least 20 seconds. This is an extremely important yet understated step. Commonly overlooked, this will allow the noodles to absorb all the goodness from the soup stock.
  7. Remove the lid and toss in the cooked prawns, squid and sliced pork belly.
  8. Moving everything in the wok aside, make space for a teaspoon of chopped garlic. Fry that till fragrant, before combining with the noodles and all.
  9. At this stage, I like to add the bits of crispy fried lard to join the party. Heart-stoppingly extravagant.
  10. Add a little more soup stock to wet the noodles. In my opinion, the best of this dish are those that have gravy to slurp at the end.
  11. Chives go in, while the fire goes out.
  12. Serve with more chives atop, a halved lime and some kickass sambal, which I haven’t tried my hand at making, yet. This time, I substituted with trusty  feisty chilli padi.
  13. Welcome a couple of Aroma Fairies, then dig in right away. Your stomach cannot wait any longer. For me, I’d like to commend Will Power for allowing me to take a photo before savagely devouring the noodles and all its brilliance.