Tag Archives: Bruschetta

Mushroom & Tomato Bruschetta

Remember this?

Mushrooms, tomatoes and basil are a winning combination.

  1. In a hot skillet, melt a knob of butter till it foams. When the foaming subsides, it means the pan is hot enough and ready.
  2. Toss in the chopped brown chestnut mushrooms and sautéed them till almost brown.
  3. Then add the chopped cherry tomatoes.
  4. Crack in a pinch of sea salt and black pepper.
  5. Add a small pinch of basil.
  6. Also, add in a small clove of garlic, finely minced.
  7. Mix it all up, and remove from the pan once the tomatoes have shrivel slightly.
  8. To deglaze the skillet and toast up some bread, toss in a small knob of butter and swirl it round.
  9. Likewise, once the foaming subsides, place the pieces of bread on. Flip as soon as they’re golden.
  10. In the meantime, roughly chop up some mixed salad leafs.
  11. Serve the bruschetta (pronounced as [brusˈketːa]) with a small drizzle of good extra virgin olive oil.

This was just an excuse to use the new plate, really.

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Mushroom & Brie Bruschetta

As I’ve said many times before, Sunday mornings are times when you truly have the opportunity to make a good breakfast for yourself. Here’s what I had this morning – Mushroom and Brie Bruschetta (pronounced as [brusˈketːa]).

 •

  1. In a hot skillet, toss in sliced mushrooms with a small knob of butter.
  2. Add a small pinch of basil and season accordingly with freshly ground sea salt and black pepper.
  3. While that’s happening, toast your bread (preferably slices of a crusty loaf, but square slices work fine as well.)
  4. Once the mushrooms are just about browned nicely, add in a tiny bit of cream just to hold everything together, then turn the heat down low.
  5. The bread should be done, get it out. Half a clove of garlic and rub it on the toast.
  6. Spoon some mushrooms onto each slice and accompany with a small handful of fresh greens, holding them down with a small wedge of Brie.
  7. Serve with fresh cherry tomatoes, and without cutlery. All hands, all goodness.

Yorkshire Paradise

It’s tragic how I had my first Yorkshire Pudding only when I came to London some months back. It was about the size of my palm, and carried a scoopful of lovely roast beef, white onions and gravy. Definitely love at first bite. I always thought they were difficult to make until I came across Jamie’s Oliver’s Mini Yorkies recipe. Literally, a piece of cake.

Long story short, the versatile Yorkshire Puddings or Mini Yorkies: with a couple of tweaks, and some true advice from Yorkshireman Niall, here’s how I like mine done:

  • 1 large egg
  • half a mug of plain flour
  • half a mug of fresh milk
  1. Into a shallow 12-hole muffin tray, liberally drizzle olive oil in one swift motion, from hole to hole without stopping. Stick into the oven and preheat to 180°C on the top rack. While that’s in there, prepare your pudding mix. It’s real similar to pancakes, so pay attention.
  2. Get the ingredients in a big bowl and mix away, till smooth.
  3. When the oil’s all hot (and maybe bubbly), get the tray out. Then, with the pudding mix, fill each hole to about half, give or take. At this stage, you’d be horrified to see the rings of oil surrounding the pudding mixture. Don’t worry, it beats using butter, hands down. (The amount should be just about right for 12 holes. Work out everything else in between.) Don’t take too long or the tray will cool down. Chuck it back into the oven for about 15 minutes.
  4. In the meantime, you can prepare a beef gravy or whatever you fancy in a yorkshire pudding. Personally, I think yorkies were created to caress beef.
  5. Keep an eye on them yorkies and you’ll see that they rise beautifully at the sides first, forming a little well of goodness. Done till golden. Brilliant. It’s plain physics, or so Sarah explains. If you forget to preheat the tray and oil till hot, the sides won’t rise.

This is what you’ll get:

I had this with a pork belly stew. More on that here.

******

A coupla months back, here’s how I had them:

After I’d gotten them out of the oven and out of the tray, this is what I stuck into each hole, and back into the heat:

  • a slice of tomato, as the base.
  • beef mince, marinated the way I like, with thyme and sage.
  • half rings of white onion.
  • cheddar, as the ‘glue’.

When the toppings were ready, on a chopping board, I plopped them onto the individual yorkies. Then, top off finally with a couple of leaves of arugula and a sprinkle of paprika.

With a snack looking this delish, you’d be a fool not to smile. (:


Easter Bruschetta

It was Easter Sunday two days ago and back home, the family always gathers for a meal. It may not be a feast of food but the cheerful banter and warm company is enjoyed by all.

This year, unfortunately, I’m away from home. However, that didn’t stop me from having a small dinner affair with a bunch of friends. While they were knocking hard at their books, churning out essays, I took to their kitchen and prepared a little somethings.

Easter Dinner Prix Fixe

Starter

Tomato Bruschetta

*

Main

Roasted Chicken Thighs

Shepherd’s Pie

Veggie Pie

Green Salad

*

Dessert

Caramel Ice Cream on Warm Brownies

*

I won’t feature all the items here, but what I’d like to share is how to go about making the starter – Tomato Bruschetta (pronounced as [brusˈketːa]). There are a few ways of doing it and here’s mine:

Place tomatoes into a deep bowl or pot and douse with boiling hot water. Ensure they are completely submerged for a couple of minutes.

Drain and remove the skin of the tomatoes. This should be pretty easy to do since they’ve been boiled through. Begin by using a knife to make a slit on the skin of the tomato.

Once that’s done, chop them all up and toss into a bowl, with a splash of olive oil, vinegar, basil, salt and pepper. Stick them into the fridge for a bit.

Toast slices of baguette in the oven or on a hot griddle pan, to your liking and sprinkle bits of chopped garlic on top. (I do this instead of adding the garlic to the tomato mixture so that the flavour of the garlic comes out stronger.)

Lay a spoonful of tomatoes on each of the baguette slices now. Top off finally with chopped arugula, for that nutty aftertaste. Done!

“Slimy, yet satisfying.”


Super Supper

It’s not midnight; I should be sleeping, but I got hungry.

This photo really doesn’t do justice to the taste, especially after you have a bite of it in your mouth.  It literally only took five minutes to make though.

But, imagine:
The explosion of garlic and pepper mixed with savoury cheese, and the pleasant hang of nutty rocket and olive oil, meaty mushrooms and earthy beef mince, sitting on crunchy crusty bread.

Now I can sleep happy.