Tag Archives: Flour

Fresh Bread

“Was your dad a baker? ‘Cos you’ve got hot buns!”

Well, baking bread is not only about them hot buns (even though it really is). It’s actually pretty fun and extremely rewarding. When that batch of freshly baked bread rolls come out of your oven, you’d be smiling from ear to ear.

I made some bread with Sarah that day and we got our recipe from Jamie Oliver’s The Return of the Naked Chef.

  • 30g/1oz fresh yeast or 3 x 7g sachets dried yeast
  • 30g/1oz honey (or sugar)
  • 625ml/just over 1 pint tepid water
  • 1kg/just over 2lb strong bread flour
  • 30g/1oz salt
  • some extra flour for dusting
  1. Dissolve the yeast and honey (or sugar) in half the tepid water
  2. On a clean surface, make a mountain of the flour. Then make a well in the centre and pour in the yeast mixture. Use a fork to introduce and mix the flour into the mixture, until all the yeast mixture is soaked up. Then pour the remaining tepid water in and mix everything together gradually in the same way. You want to do this until you have a moist dough. (Some flours may require more water than others, so don’t be a afraid to adjust the quantities.)
  3. Knead away! Whack, smack, punch and work at the dough to activate the gluten. Do this for about  5 minutes. Great way to relieve any pent up frustrations. Hah. If any of the dough sticks to your hands, rub them together with a little extra flour.
  4. When you’re done kneading, make the dough into a roundish shape and flour the top of it. Deeply score the dough with a knife, allowing it to relax and rise with ease (and with yeast). Then, flour a deep mixing bowl as well and place the dough in. Cover with clingflim and let it rise till it doubles in size. Jamie says, “Ideally you want a warm, moist, draught-free place for the quickest prove.” This should take about 40 minutes.
  5. When the dough has grown twice its size, get it out and bash it about for about a minute or so before shaping it to whatever form you want. Then let it sit and rise again for other 40 minutes or so. This second proving is extremely crucial as it’s the time your bread becomes delicately soft and lovely.
  6. Preheat your oven to 180ºC.
  7. Cooking the bread now requires tender handling and patience. No more hard bashes and violent grabbing. You want the air in the bread to stay inside, so gently place the bread into the preheated oven, without slamming the door.
  8. Monitor the baking, take it out when the bread’s beautifully bronzed and hollow-sounding when tapped. Leave them on a rack to cool.

Here’s what we made with this batch of dough:

Bread Rolls

Ham Rolls

Chocolate Buns

Cinnamon Rolls

Get your hands into some flour and yeast, and knead away today.

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Apricot Jam Mug Cake

I’ve been wanting to try out a recipe like this for a really long time now. Not only ‘cos I crave cake at the end of every hearty dinner at home, but also ‘cos I’m amused at how easy it sounds.

Originally, I wanted to do the Nutella Mug Cake, which can be done in a coupla of minutes in a microwave. But I’ve got no Nutella at home. The horror, I know. :/

Anyway, here’s the successful result of my little experiment, of substituting all the chocolate with jam:

Perfect for a quick cake fix.

Ingredients:

  • 4 tablespoons self-rising flour
  • 4 tablespoons sugar
  • 3 tablespoons apricot jam
  • 3 tablespoons milk
  • 3 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 egg
Steps:
  1. Get it all in a large coffee mug and whisk till smooth with a fork.
  2. Stick it in the microwave on high heat for about 1.5 – 3 minutes, depending on your microwave.
  3. Serve with more jam atop.

Beer-less Friday Fish Batter

If you’re lazy and want some batter for deep-frying fish fillets, check this recipe out.

But if you feel a little more hardworking and wish to have that fish-&-chips style of batter, then this is for you. Alas, in certain places of the world, beer isn’t exactly cheap. If you’re from those places, like me, here’s an awesome Beer-less Batter for your fish fillets.

What you’ll need:

  • 12 finger-length cod fillets
  • 2/3 mug of plain flour
  • 1/2 mug of corn flour
  • 1/2 tablespoon baking powder
  • zest of 1 lemon
  • 1 egg
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1 generous pinch of salt
  • 1 hearty dash of black pepper
  • vegetable oil, for deep frying
  • 1 bag of courage
How to do it:
  1. Get everything, except the fish and oil, into a mixing bowl. Mix till smooth. TIP! What you’re going for is a semi-solid-thick-gravy kind of consistency, so add the water in small quantities while mixing your way through. If the water’s not adequate, use more. Just make sure it doesn’t get to diluted.
  2. Let it rest about for a bit. While you get you deep-frying oil into your wok, and up to the right temperature. TIP! Plonk a small potato into the oil too, and when that turns golden brown, your oil is ready.
  3. Dunk the fish fillets into the batter, coating each piece in gooey goodness.
  4. Deep-fry away! (Till golden brown only.)
  5. Drain on a cake grill with paper towels underneath.
  6. Serve with a slice of lemon and mayonnaise.

Deep-Fried Batter

If deep-fried food was not sinful, if it contained no cholesterol nor calories, would you eat it every day? I know I would. Anyway, here’s an amazingly easy recipe for Deep-Frying Batter. I won’t give exact amounts ‘cos what you want to know is the consistency of the batter; that way, you’ll be able to make whatever amount you need.

These are the things you need:

  • Mixing bowl
  • Self-Raising Flour
  • Beer
  • Salt
  1. Get some flour into that mixing bowl and add beer in small amounts little by little.
  2. Whisk as you go along, until you eventually get a creamy texture.
  3. Then, add salt at your own discretion.
  4. There, your batter is done!

You can deep-fry practically anything, fish sticks, small chicken fillets, shrimps, or clams. What’s REALLY so very incredibly good with this batter is Green Beans. The dance of bouncy bean flavour and crunchy light batter is phenomenal.

N.B. Make sure your oil is hot enough before you deep fry. I usually just drip a tiny drop of batter in as a test. If it sizzles itself crazy, then the oil is ready.

Cheers, to deep-fried food!


Good Friday Roux

It’s Good Friday today and I’m taking the day off from the kitchen. But that doesn’t mean I’m not gonna be posting anything here. :P

Lesson for the Day: Making A Roux (pronounced as \ˈrü\).

My method is unorthodox, so follow at your own risk:

  • Medium-low heat.
  • Three ingredients: Fat, Flour, Milk.
  • Fat can be any kind from butter, oil, fat rendered from bacon or fatty juices from a roast.
  • Flour is added in an equal part to the fat, in terms of weight, not volume. (Cornflour can be used but much less is needed since its thickening properties are stronger than that of plain flour.)
  • Using a whisk or whatever, combine the two briefly.
  • While doing so, add milk in small quantities.
  • Do this until you get a single glob or a sauce-like texture, whichever you need.

With this trick up your sleeve, creamed vegetables and alfredos aren’t an obstacle anymore. (: