Tag Archives: Fusilli

Oriental Fusilli Fry

Another one to add to the vegetarian recipe list, this is a great dish to whizz up if you wanna have both pasta and that salty Asian flavour.

  1. Usual drill, set your fusilli boiling away in a pot.
  2. In a hot skillet with a tablespoon of vegetable oil, toss in minced garlic and fry till fragrant.
  3. Add torn mushrooms and cubed hard-skin tofu, frying till golden.
  4. Tear in a handful of gem lettuce for the texture of sweet crunch. Turn of the heat.
  5. Drain pasta, and together with a small bit of pasta-cooking water, add to the skillet.
  6. Add a teaspoon of oyster sauce and mix up well.
  7. Season accordingly with soy sauce and white pepper powder.
  8. Plate up and garnish with finish sliced fresh chilli, and a small crack of black pepper.

Aglio Olio

I’ve posted this recipe before, and we’re all pretty familiar with Aglio Olio and how it tastes. Yesterday, for a friend’s housewarming party, I made some with fusilli, as opposed to the conventional spaghetti. I guess the key really is about garlic-olive oil mixture and getting it right. Once you’ve got the seasoning right, any pasta works in this crowd-pleaser.

Here’s what makes up that awesome garlic flavour:

  • garlic, minced
  • red chilli, minced
  • basil leaves, minced
  • dried basil leaves
  • dried oregano leaves
  • fresh parsley, minced
  • freshly ground black pepper
  • crushed sea salt
  • olive oil
  • shaved parmesan
A winner. (:

Clean Water Brunch

Last week, I suffered heart palpitations irregularly over a period of 24 hours. It worried me BIG time, and I knew I had to turn to ‘clean’ food.

Marmite Pasta with Boiled Pork and Peas

  • 1 serving of pasta
  • 50g of lean pork
  • 1 handful of peas
  • 1 tsp of Marmite
  • 1 egg

Basically, I cooked everything with water: boiled the pasta, pork and peas, and steamed the egg. I also added a bit of the pasta-cooking water to the Marmite, and drizzled generously over the dish before eating.

Clean, and very healthy. If not for me, for my heart.

(Ironic previous post: Deep-Fried Batter.)


Mushroom Treatment

Ignore the Very Succulent Braised Chicken Portions. What I’d like to turn your attention to, is the bland-looking mishmash of a pasta.

Lesson for the Day:

Butter, mushrooms, garlic and oregano are a fantastic combination, a crowd-pleaser. But if what you wanna achieve out-of-this-world fireworks that will knock your loved ones out of their seats, add finely grated cheddar and chopped rocket before you take the pasta out of the pan. The nutty flavour of rocket will complement earthy oregano and mushrooms beautifully. The cheese sticks everything together, and adds the coveted stringy trail in every bite.

If you’re still looking at that juicy chicken thigh, I’m sorry the pasta doesn’t look as good. More on the Very Succulent Braised Chicken Portions here.


Cheesy Eggy

Discovered a new way to eat pasta today. No, it doesn’t involve using bare hands to dig in. It’s actually a slightly different kinda sauce from the usual white sauce. Almost like carbonara but less rich and more tasty. I think. Here’s how to make, what I’d like to call, Cheesy Eggy Pasta.

Fry the bacon to render out some of that glistening fat. Then, add a wad of butter together with the mushrooms and peas. Don’t forget some oregano to complete the wholeness of flavour. Let the pasta join in the party when it’s done al dente.

When you’re happy with the way everything looks in the pan, add milk. Just enough to make a sauce. And just before the milk boils, crack in an egg and grate in a hunk of cheese. Now, turn down the heat and mix. Don’t forget the salt and pepper. Parsley, optional.

Finally, get ready to sink your teeth into a marvellous alliance of bacon, egg and cheese, all in your pasta sauce.


Black Saturday Tea

It being Black Saturday, I wanted to make a black meal. But I didn’t plan ahead. Also, because of all days, I ran out of dark soy sauce today, this is all I could come up with:

Fusilli is easy to cook to I’m not gonna go into the details of how to cook it – set pot on hob with a little water inside. Turn switch to full whack. Boil water in electric kettle, just enough to cook pasta. Once water boils, pour it into the hot hob and then dump in the fusilli to be cooked.

Personally, I prefer getting the quick-cook type of pasta. Not only does it cook faster, it also has a bouncier bite.

So, with the lack of my blackening agent i.e. dark soy sauce, I attempted to blacken the green beans and mushrooms ‘naturally’. When setting the fusilli boiling pot on the hob, I also set a non-stick pot on the next hob and turned the switch to the max as well. While I was preparing the ingredients, that pot had all the time to get really hot. Finally, when the time was right, in went the beans, mushrooms, a small hunk of butter and patience.

Tick-tock, tick-tock. Sit and wait for the lovelies to get blackish, whilst tossing them about every now and then.

I did the same with the beef mince (which cannot be seen in the photograph) – marinating it first with basil, cornflour, salt and pepper. Then, dumping everything in, after I got the blackened beans and mushrooms out.

Most importantly, not forgetting the last step of getting everything into the pot for a final toss about. If I had my blackening agent, it would’ve been the perfect black saturday tea-time snack. :/

If only.


The Big Bang

Okay, I’m having dinner right now and I cannot help but jot this down somewhere.  I’m having the best dinner ever in london; the best dinner I’ve cooked so far:

  • Braised Pork Cubes with coriander, on Pan-seared Fresh Mushrooms and Onions with rosemary
  • Buttered Fusilli with red bell peppers, carrots and lettuce

 

So when I put all these into my mouth at once, imagine the flavour of savoury pork and peppery gravy tussling with the almost honey-like fragrance of rosemary and bell peppers, combined with the slight but adequate charcoalish taste of the onions and mushrooms.

Also, the tangy texture of the meat in beautiful contest with the starchy bite of the pasta, complemented by the crunch of carrots and crispness of lettuce. not forgetting the zesty aftertaste of the humble olive oil and balsamic vinegar dressing.

Lush.