Tag Archives: Gravy

Waste No Gravy!

Here’s help get every bit of gravy out of the pan whenever you make Melt-In-Your-Mouth Pork or Black Pepper Beef. You need to be doing two things: 1) Making Melt-In-Your-Mouth Pork or Black Pepper Beef. 2) Having it with steamed rice.

After you’re done with the meat dishes and have gotten them out of the pan, add in a couple of scoops of your steamed rice. Turn on the heat and toss everything about. Let the immaculate grains of fragrant starch slip into the bronze coats of savoury delight.

No gravy wasted, flavoured rice, and your pan’s now easier to wash.


Pork Belly in Chinese Gravy

Ingredients

  • 200g pork belly, thinly sliced,

marinated with:

  • 1 tbsp cornflour
  • 2 tsp sesame oil
  • 1 tbsp light soy sauce
  • 1 tsp freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 dash white pepper powder

*****

  • half a bulb garlic, minced
  • 2 inches of a large carrot, cut into small inch-long pieces
  • 1 tbsp vegetable oil
  • 3 tbsp dark soy sauce
  • salt
  • 300ml water
  • a pinch of fresh coriander leaves, chopped

Preparation and Cooking

  1. Marinade the pork belly and prepare the carrot and garlic.
  2. In a hot wok with the vegetable oil, fry the garlic till fragrant.
  3. Toss in the carrot and fry till almost done.
  4. Put in the marinaded pork belly and stir about, adding water in small quantities, adding each time the wok gets dry.
  5. When the meat is about done, add all the remaining water at a go to form a gravy.
  6. Add dark soy sauce, and salt to taste.
  7. When it starts to boil, turn down the heat to a simmer for approximately  15 minutes, longer if you want the pork to be even more tender, and if your stomach can wait.
  8. Serve with fresh coriander.

You can have this with steamed rice or Mini Yorkshire Puddings. Delish.


Yorkshire Paradise

It’s tragic how I had my first Yorkshire Pudding only when I came to London some months back. It was about the size of my palm, and carried a scoopful of lovely roast beef, white onions and gravy. Definitely love at first bite. I always thought they were difficult to make until I came across Jamie’s Oliver’s Mini Yorkies recipe. Literally, a piece of cake.

Long story short, the versatile Yorkshire Puddings or Mini Yorkies: with a couple of tweaks, and some true advice from Yorkshireman Niall, here’s how I like mine done:

  • 1 large egg
  • half a mug of plain flour
  • half a mug of fresh milk
  1. Into a shallow 12-hole muffin tray, liberally drizzle olive oil in one swift motion, from hole to hole without stopping. Stick into the oven and preheat to 180°C on the top rack. While that’s in there, prepare your pudding mix. It’s real similar to pancakes, so pay attention.
  2. Get the ingredients in a big bowl and mix away, till smooth.
  3. When the oil’s all hot (and maybe bubbly), get the tray out. Then, with the pudding mix, fill each hole to about half, give or take. At this stage, you’d be horrified to see the rings of oil surrounding the pudding mixture. Don’t worry, it beats using butter, hands down. (The amount should be just about right for 12 holes. Work out everything else in between.) Don’t take too long or the tray will cool down. Chuck it back into the oven for about 15 minutes.
  4. In the meantime, you can prepare a beef gravy or whatever you fancy in a yorkshire pudding. Personally, I think yorkies were created to caress beef.
  5. Keep an eye on them yorkies and you’ll see that they rise beautifully at the sides first, forming a little well of goodness. Done till golden. Brilliant. It’s plain physics, or so Sarah explains. If you forget to preheat the tray and oil till hot, the sides won’t rise.

This is what you’ll get:

I had this with a pork belly stew. More on that here.

******

A coupla months back, here’s how I had them:

After I’d gotten them out of the oven and out of the tray, this is what I stuck into each hole, and back into the heat:

  • a slice of tomato, as the base.
  • beef mince, marinated the way I like, with thyme and sage.
  • half rings of white onion.
  • cheddar, as the ‘glue’.

When the toppings were ready, on a chopping board, I plopped them onto the individual yorkies. Then, top off finally with a couple of leaves of arugula and a sprinkle of paprika.

With a snack looking this delish, you’d be a fool not to smile. (:


Good Ol’ Chinese Noodles

To all those overseas who crave the good ol’ Tze Char Noodles, I’d like to share this recipe with you. It’s not exactly the same as what you’d get for cheap in the neighbourhood restaurant you frequent weekly back in Singapore, but it’ll serve to satisfy your cravings.

What you’ll need:

  • prepared ingredients for Melt-In-Your-Mouth Pork
  • 1 serving of quick-cook spaghetti
  • 1 generous handful of spinach leaves
  • 2 inches of a medium sized carrot, sliced into small inch-long pieces
  • half a red onion, sliced
  • 2 cloves of garlic, minced
  • a couple of fresh mushrooms, quartered (optional)
  • 1 tsp of vegetable oil
  • 2-3 tbsp of oyster sauce
How to do it:
  1. Get the pasta cooking in a pot. And place a wok on another hob, turned up to full whack.
  2. Add the garlic and onion into the wok to flavour the oil.
  3. Welcome the Aroma Fairies.
  4. Carrots go in ‘cos they take longer to cook through.
  5. Toss the pork in and add water from the pasta bit by bit, stir-frying till just done.
  6. If you’re having mushrooms with this, dump them in now.
  7. Add the oyster sauce and grab some pasta water to pour into the wok, till ingredients are almost completely submerged. Mix and watch your gravy form.
  8. Turn off the heat and drain your pasta. Get them in, together with the spinach leaves. Toss about till the spaghetti is coated with all the gravy goodness, and till the vegetable leaves have wilted just a little.
  9. Serve hot, with Pickled Green Chilli. More on that soon.


The Incomplete Pie

Here’s a great alternative if you’re lazy to make a complete pie.

Beef and gravy sitting pretty in a well of potato mash.

 

The Incomplete Pie

For this, instead of using minced meat, I used chunks of beef. Be sure to cut them into small pieces so they’ll be soft when cooked through and not stiff like rubber.

When devouring this treat, take time to enjoy how the gravy flows out once the potato wall is broken.

Outright luxurious.