Tag Archives: Lettuce

Pasta BLT

BLT, or Bacon, Lettuce and Tomato, commonly refers to a sandwich. This week, I made a BLT, but with spaghetti instead of bread.

  1. Get your spaghetti or other kinda of pasta cooking in a pot of well-salted boiling water. Save a bit of the pasta water, and drain when al dente.
  2. Slow-cook chunky slices of tomatoes with some butter on a skillet, letting them soften to a pulp. Pinch out and discard the skin at the end.
  3. Soak a couple of rashers in water for a couple of minutes; this is so that the dish will not be overwhelmed by the flavour of bacon. Fry the rashers till cooked but not shrivelled. It can be tempting to blaze them to a crisp. Resist.
  4. Meanwhile, wash and cut your lettuce to fork-full pieces.
  5. When the tomatoes are done, toss in the drained spaghetti, and splash a bit of that pasta water you saved earlier. Season lightly with sea salt and freshly ground black pepper, and a small dollop of mayonnaise.
  6. Turn off the heat and mix in the lettuce briefly, and serve, with the rashers of bacon, sliced.

Lush brunches, forever.

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Oriental Fusilli Fry

Another one to add to the vegetarian recipe list, this is a great dish to whizz up if you wanna have both pasta and that salty Asian flavour.

  1. Usual drill, set your fusilli boiling away in a pot.
  2. In a hot skillet with a tablespoon of vegetable oil, toss in minced garlic and fry till fragrant.
  3. Add torn mushrooms and cubed hard-skin tofu, frying till golden.
  4. Tear in a handful of gem lettuce for the texture of sweet crunch. Turn of the heat.
  5. Drain pasta, and together with a small bit of pasta-cooking water, add to the skillet.
  6. Add a teaspoon of oyster sauce and mix up well.
  7. Season accordingly with soy sauce and white pepper powder.
  8. Plate up and garnish with finish sliced fresh chilli, and a small crack of black pepper.

Samsui Labour

It’s Labour Day and the Samsui Women of historical Singapore came to mind. Here’s a little explanation from Wikipedia:

“The term Samsui Women broadly refers to a group of Chinese immigrants who came to Singapore between the 1920s and the 1940s in search of construction and industrial jobs. Their hard work contributed to Singapore’s development, both as a colony and as a nation.

Photo Courtesy of Wan Oligarchy

The Samsui Women came from Sanshui of Guangdong (Canton) Province in China, in addition to Shunde and Dongguan. Most Samsui Women are Cantonese (90%) but there are Hakka (10%) as well.

In Chinese, these women are referred to as 紅頭巾 (红头巾 in Simplified Chinese), which translates as “red bandana”, a reference to the trademark red cloth hats that they wore.

Coming to Singapore as cheap labourers, Samsui Women worked mainly in the construction industry and other industries that required hard labour. They also worked as domestic servants. They had a reputation of rejecting jobs involving drug (particularly opium) peddling, prostitution, or other vices, even if that meant they sometimes had to live in poverty.”

According to Soup Restaurant, Singapore, the Samsui Ginger Chicken is a ‘traditional Samsui dish consumed by the Samsui Women in Chinatown. Due to their low income, the Samsui Ginger Chicken was only consumed once a year, during the Chinese New Year. Chicken, steamed without much seasoning is dipped in fragrant ginger sauce before consumption.’

Here’s how make your own Samsui Ginger Chicken:

Salt the chicken slightly two hours before steaming. And once thoroughly cooked, submerge completely and immediately in ice cold water. This stops the cooking process and keeps the meat taut.

For the ginger sauce, it’s a mixture of old and young ginger, chicken or vegetable oil, sesame oil, and salt, (plus a bit of garlic too). I can’t list the proportions of ingredients because I’m not sure myself. Trial and error is the way to go till you get it right.

Serve with lettuce and cucumber. Remember our Samsui Women.