Tag Archives: Mash

Asian Fish & Potatoes

There’s a reason fish and chips exists: the combination of fish and potatoes is quite a thing of marriage. In any case, like Haddock on Smash or Unbattered Pollock & Chips, this fish and potatoes recipe is very much asian – Battered spicy beancurd-marinated sutchi fillet on sesame mash of potatoes, carrots and white radish, with sweet gem lettuce and calamansi.

  1. Set peeled and sliced potatoes, carrot and radish away to boil. When done, drain and let it steam dry in the colander for about 5 minutes or so. Then, mash with a knob of butter, a splash of milk, salt, pepper and a few drops of sesame oil.
  2. Marinate the fish fillets with spicy beancurd and dust with self-raising flour. Be sure to pat dry the fillets before doing this. Deep fry till golden brown. Cool on a cooling rack laid with kitchen towel.
  3. Serve all together with fresh leaves of sweet gem lettuce and half a calamansi for squeezing. Golden brown fried sliced shallots with the mash is a HUGE bonus.

Pan-seared Chicken Thigh on Carrot Mash

It’s evident that I’ve been watching way too many cooking shows: I’m addicted to the playing with my food now. All the minimalistic presentations, calling for finesse and vibrance, beckoning the appetite of the impatient diner. I just wanna eat good food without paying exorbitant prices.

Pan-seared chicken thigh on a bed of carrot mash, with peas, parsley and a white wine jus.

A beautiful celebration of crispy chicken skin and velvety sweet carrot, mingling with the succulent texture of the poultry, the playful burst of peas and the rowdiness of parsley. Then everything comes to a halt to welcome the zesty twang of lemon in the delightful reduction of white wine and chicken oil. In dishes like these, a delicious tune is heard with every bite.


Poached Egg Breakfast

Two mornings ago, I woke up from a dream; one about breakfast.

This is what I dreamt about:

 

Poached egg on pan-seared honey baked ham and toast, sitting on a mash of garden peas. With butter glazed mushrooms and basil tomatoes.

Perfect way to start the day.

Photography: Sarah Lee


Royal Purple Mash

This is actually yam ice cream.

I’m kidding.

It’s your good ol’ mashed potatoes, gone wrong.

  1. Get a bag of purple potatoes from your supermarket, or backyard (if you grow them). Peel the skin off with a speed peeler. Be careful not to slice your skin off while you’re at it. I’m just saying. I didn’t slice my thumb.
  2. Boil them till soft in a pot of water on the stove. Marvel at the water turning into a deep teal colour.
  3. Once soft enough, drain and mash away.
  4. In a mortar and pestle, crush a pinch of dried thyme.
  5. Add the crushed thyme, to the mash, together with freshly ground sea salt, black pepper, a small knob of butter and cream or milk.
  6. Serve to puzzled yet excited guests.

Carrot Smash

Easy as ABC. Great as can be.

  1. Using a speed peeler, get rid of the wrinkly skin of the carrots, however many you’re planning to eat.
  2. Slice them erratically and toss them in a pot of boiling water. Let them sit in that jacuzzi till they’re soft enough to mash.
  3. Drain and mash away!
  4. Add a generous drizzle of some good extra virgin olive oil, freshly ground sea salt and black pepper.
  5. Have it as a side; fabulous with a pork main.

King’s Asparagus

Asparagus and Bacon, were made for each other. Due to impatience and negligence, this didn’t turn out quite right for me. Follow the instructions below and I’m sure you’ll get a better result.

The beauty of this dish is that apart from the potato mash, no seasoning is required. I made a mash so that it’ll be a bigger meal. If you exclude the carbohydrate, it’s a breakfast fit for a king.

Here’s how to make your own Asparagus in Bacon & Egg Jacket.

Ingredients

  • 3 streaks of bacon, halved lengthways
  • 6 stalks of asparagus
  • 2 large eggs

Asparagus in Bacon

Using the smoked bacon, wrap the sticks of asparagus. Grill in the oven at 200°C till brown and crispy, flipping them at midpoint. (They looked so good that I got impatient and hungry, so they didn’t make it to the slightly crispy and almost charred stage. I couldn’t do it, but you can.)

Soft-boiled Eggs

There’s a trick to getting them right even though you can’t see what’s going on inside. Stick a pot of water on the hob and get your eggs in. Make sure there’s enough water so that the eggs are completely submerged. Hit the switch to full whack. Once the water boils, turn off the heat and let the eggs soak for about 3 minutes. Flush them briefly with cold water and place them on those little egg holders, or shot-glasses would do. With the ‘sharper’ tip of the eggs pointing downwards, lop the tops off with a knife. Say hello to your golden yolks.

Consumption

To consume, grab a stick of that pretty asparagus, with your fork or fingers, it doesn’t matter. Dunk it into the soft-boiled eggs and take a bite. Let the incredible nuttiness of asparagus mingle with the smokey aroma of bacon. Pay attention to the lush gooey texture of the egg, holding everything together. And just before you swallow, have a little wad of potato mash join the party.

Feel like a king yet?


The Incomplete Pie

Here’s a great alternative if you’re lazy to make a complete pie.

Beef and gravy sitting pretty in a well of potato mash.

 

The Incomplete Pie

For this, instead of using minced meat, I used chunks of beef. Be sure to cut them into small pieces so they’ll be soft when cooked through and not stiff like rubber.

When devouring this treat, take time to enjoy how the gravy flows out once the potato wall is broken.

Outright luxurious.


Shepherd’s Pie

What better day to share about Shepherd’s Pie than on Easter Sunday, the day our shepherd, Jesus Christ resurrected from the dead.

It’s really simple to make one and the best part about it, you can go crazy with whatever goes inside. It’s basically a potato mash and a minced meat filling. Here’s the rough structure to how you can make one:

The Potato Mash

Slice the potatoes and toss it into a pot of boiling water. I like using small potatoes because they cook faster, but whichever you use doesn’t really matter. Sometimes, I toss in some carrots as well. This gives the mash a little mix of orange with yellow. You can even try it with sweet potatoes, or purple ones. Try it out and let me know!

Once the root veggies are translucent, drain and mash with a small hunk of butter, a splash of milk, some grated cheese of your choice and a sprinkle of salt and pepper. Oh, if you’re wondering, I actually do leave the skin of the potatoes on for two reasons – one: it adds variety to the bite texture, and two: I’m lazy to skin them.

The Minced Meat Filling

While the potatoes are soaking in the very hot boiling water, prepare your kickass filling. The traditional meat used should be lamb, hence the name. But people I’ve made it for like it better when it’s a ‘cowherd’ pie. Yes, beef is my meat of choice. You can use peas, mushrooms, carrots, onions, green beans, and whatever tickles your fancy in a meat pie. Just make sure everything is chopped up nice and pretty before you dump them together.

When it comes to herbs, basil, oregano, sage, thyme or rosemary will add a lovely aroma. Again, whichever you prefer. Cook everything with a splash of red wine, salt and pepper. Ah yes, and if it’s beef, be sure to include a bit of vinegar in the mix. Finally, this is extremely unconventional but I don’t like it when my beef isn’t a rich dark brown, so to solve this, I turn to a few drops of my trusty blackening agent i.e. Dark Soy Sauce.

The Shepherd’s Pie

Once both components are ready, grab a roasting dish and fill the base with a thin layer of potato mash. Next, enters the filling and finally, the mash again to cover everything up lovely. Sometimes, (when you have not enough mash) you can leave out the base layer.

See, it’s not difficult. Try it, and remember, it’s all up to you! (:

Last but not least, everyone here at Cook for Myself would like to take this opportunity to wish you a Happy and Holy Easter!