Tag Archives: Milk

Fish Spaghetti in Cream Sauce

Alright, so maybe it’s not really cream. But it’s pretty close I reckon, and less heartstopping, I think.

  1. Get your quick-cook spaghetti boiling together with the chopped carrots in a pot on the hob.
  2. In a skillet on medium low heat, melt a hunk of butter, then add in a splash of wine, a squeeze of lemon, a small amount of garlic puree and a thin slice of ginger. Crack in some salt and pepper too. Make sure you’ve got enough liquid to baste the fish.
  3. Once everything has combined, remove the slice of ginger, it has done its job.
  4. Make sure the fillet of fish has been pat dry, gently place it in the pan and baste it away on medium heat.
  5. Remove as soon as the fish is cooked. Take care not overdo it.
  6. Drain your spaghetti if it’s done.
  7. With the remaining butter and fish liquid rendered, add equal volumes of milk and flour. TIP! Usually, I add the milk to determine the amount of sauce I want, then add a little more milk, before adding flour in small quantities till the desired consistency.
  8. Taste the sauce and adjust the seasoning accordingly. Squeeze more lemon juice if necessary.
  9. Serve the sauce drizzled over the fish and spaghetti.
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Scrambled Eggs

Scrambled Eggs.

Awesome Breakfast.

Everybody’s Favourite.

Ramblings:

  • 2 eggs, cracked in a bowl, unbeaten
  • ¼ mug of milk
  • small knob of butter
  • small handful of finely grated cheddar
  • pinch of dried oregano
  • freshly ground sea salt and black pepper, to taste

Scrambling:

  1. Everybody’s got their own method of scrambling eggs but here’s how I like mine done:
  2. A small knob of butter goes in on a skillet, on high heat.
  3. Once the butter melts, put in the eggs and turn down the heat to low.
  4. Using a spatula, break the yolks and scramble the eggs erratically.
  5. Add the milk, cheese and oregano. Stir about till done.
  6. Season with salt and pepper accordingly.

I like my scrambled eggs with chunks of white and yellow, as opposed to having everything mixed thoroughly into a single colour. Then again, do it any way you like.

The scramble for scrambled eggs ends here. Hah.


Bandung

This is slowly being forgotten and washed away from the childhood’s of little kids here in Singapore. When I was young enough to barely peep over the kitchen counter, this pink drink rocked my world. It’s called Bandung, pronounced as bahn-doong, not band-dung. I emphasis on how to say it right, but I’ve no idea what that word means, or what language it is either. I just know it’s happiness in a cup. So easy to make, so cheap, and yet incredibly satisfying. Especially since this sunny island never enjoys temperatures lower than 20ªC, you can savour this beverage all year round!

  • 3 tbsp rose syrup
  • 200ml water
  • 4 tbsp fresh milk
  • 5 cubes of ice
  1. Put the syrup in the glass first, then add water. Have a taste, to see if it’s sweet enough or too sweet for you. Tweak it accordingly with more rose syrup or more water. TIP! It should be slightly sweeter since you’re gonna be adding ice.
  2. Now add the ice and add the milk. TIP! Add the milk in small quantities, stopping when you think it’s getting too milky for your liking. Some people I know like their Bandung a sexy pink, as opposed to baby pink.

Happy days, cool afternoons.


Good Friday Roux

It’s Good Friday today and I’m taking the day off from the kitchen. But that doesn’t mean I’m not gonna be posting anything here. :P

Lesson for the Day: Making A Roux (pronounced as \ˈrü\).

My method is unorthodox, so follow at your own risk:

  • Medium-low heat.
  • Three ingredients: Fat, Flour, Milk.
  • Fat can be any kind from butter, oil, fat rendered from bacon or fatty juices from a roast.
  • Flour is added in an equal part to the fat, in terms of weight, not volume. (Cornflour can be used but much less is needed since its thickening properties are stronger than that of plain flour.)
  • Using a whisk or whatever, combine the two briefly.
  • While doing so, add milk in small quantities.
  • Do this until you get a single glob or a sauce-like texture, whichever you need.

With this trick up your sleeve, creamed vegetables and alfredos aren’t an obstacle anymore. (: