Tag Archives: Rosemary

Rosemary(ed) Pork Spaghetti

It’s been a busy busy week. Here’s one of the hasty but hefty meals I made during the course of the past seven days.

Stir-fried and real quick to make.

Almost Asian, use a fork to rake.

  • 1 portion quick cook spaghetti
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 80g lean pork, or pork shoulder, thinly sliced
  • 2 inches carrot, cut into small 1-inch slices
  • 1 brown mushroom, sliced
  • 1 handful young spinach leaves
  • 2 sprigs fresh rosemary
  • 1 tbsp vegetable oil
  • sea salt and black pepper, freshly ground

•••

  1. As always, set your pasta away in a pot of boiling water. Carrots go in there as well.
  2. In a hot wok, heat up the oil. Dip the sprigs of rosemary into the pasta pot for 5 seconds, before tossing into the wok. TIP! This exposure to hot water for such a short time make a world of a difference; the herb begins to release its fragrant oils.
  3. Just before the rosemary starts getting too happy in there, toss in the garlic and fry till fragrant.
  4. Then add in the pork. Stir about and add water from the pasta pot in small quantities, to aid to cooking of the meat.
  5. The pasta should be done soon. So toss in the mushrooms to the wok now.
  6. Drain the pasta when al dente and add to the wok. Turn off the heat.
  7. Spinach goes in as well. Mix well.
  8. Season accordingly with sea salt and black pepper.
  9. Once spinach has wilted, serve.

Pork Shoulder: Five-Hour Slow Roast

Dear Samuel, it’s your birthday today, so this one’s for you.

*****

This is how a Five-Hour Pork Shoulder Slow Roast would look like.

Especially after being completely macerated with a pair of tongs and a cerated knife.

Okay, I screwed up the crackling on this one big time. But the meat was just perfect. It better be after five hours of baking in the oven.

  1. Get a hunk of pork shoulder (about 800g to 1kg) from the supermarket or butcher. If you can get it with the bone in, even better.
  2. I can’t comment much on how to do the crackling right. But in theory, here’s how it goes: Score the skin half a centimetre deep, and about a centimetre apart. Rub salt into the crevices.
  3. Season everywhere else with freshly ground sea salt and black pepper.
  4. Get the whole hunk of meat on a roasting dish and stick it in the oven for 30 minutes, at 220ªC. This should make a crackling happen.
  5. When the crackling looks right, wrap the whole dish snugly with a double layer of foil and stick it back into the oven for 4 hours, at 180*C. Go out and have a beer with the lads, or have a nap.
  6. Prepare some stuff to accompany the pork shoulder – carrot slices, diced onions, smashed garlic (a whole bulb, skin on) and a couple of rosemary sprigs.
  7. After four hours, remove the foil and set in the carrots, onions, garlic and rosemary. Baste everything in the fat rendered at the base of the dish.
  8. Stick it back into the oven for another half hour before serving.

It sounds like a lot of work to do, but it’s so simple for something so amazing. Tender tender goodness.


Bacon-Wrapped Chicken Fillets

If you haven’t heard or seen this before, you must absolutely try it out sometime. Bacon-Wrapped Chicken Fillets will knock your socks off.

Depending on how many you’d like to make, this is what you’ll need for just a humble TWO pieces. But you know you’ll definitely want more.

Two ingredients, two simple steps, for two awesome chunks of meaty goodness.

  • 2 streaks of smoked bacon or pancetta.
  • 2 fillets of chicken, cut into pieces two inches long
  1. Put a piece of chicken on one end of a streak of bacon and roll it to the other end.
  2. Stick it into the top rack of the oven at 180°C for about 20 minutes, flipping it at midpoint.
TIP! If you wanna be a tad more adventurous, sprinkle a dash of thyme, rosemary or basil across each streak of bacon before rolling.
Also, this goes fantastic with a potato mash and gravy. More on that next time.

Honey Baked Chicken Thighs

I am a complete sucker for chicken. Using hands and getting dirty somehow adds to the flavour of the food. Fried chicken is what usually gets me going, but oven baked ones are awesome too. For this, it’s best you marinade it overnight, in a bag, in the fridge.

This is for 6 pieces of Honey Baked Chicken Thigh.

Marinade:

  • 1 generous lug of white wine
  • 1 tsp of dried rosemary
  • 1 tbsp of honey, or 2 if you want
  • 2 cloves of garlic, thinly sliced
  • 1 tsp of dark soy sauce, for colour
  • 1 tsp of olive oil
  • 1 pinch of salt
  • 1 pinch of pepper
Preparation:
  1. Get your chicken into a ziplock bag.
  2. It doesn’t matter if the chicken portions are frozen or not, just make sure they’re not stuck to each other.
  3. Get all that stuff of marinade into the bag with the chicken.
  4. Take care to get every bit of meat covered in the marinade.
  5. Stick it in the fridge overnight.
Cooking:
  1. The chicken should have thawed through beautifully and at the same time, have absorbed all that sweet goodness of your marinade. Get your chicken on a tray, skin side up and cover with foil.
  2. In a pre-heated oven of 220°C, stick the tray in for 45 minutes.
  3. After the buzzer goes, remove the foil and turn the temperature down to 180°C. Leave the tray in there for another 15 minutes or so, or until the skin turns golden.
  4. TIP! Not sure if it’s cooked through? Poke in with a fork. If it’s cooked, the juices will run clear, not red.
  5. Let it rest for a couple of minutes.
  6. Serve, without cutlery.

Little Lamb

Today, I was on my routine grocery run at the supermarket, when a hunk of lamb breast caught my eye.

Then I remembered seeing a recipe about a 4-hour lamb roast.

Grab.

Here’s what you need:

  • 600g of lamb
  • 7 sprigs of rosemary
  • 6 cloves of garlic
  • 1 tsp of salt
  • 1 tsp of pepper
  • 1 tbsp of olive oil

Here’s how you do it:

  1. Turn the oven to full whack.
  2. Score the lamb erratically and season with salt and pepper. Be sure to cover both sides.
  3. Smash the garlic cloves and toss half the number of them into a roasting tray.
  4. Lay in half of the rosemary sprigs as well.
  5. Then sit the hunk of meat in the tray.
  6. Drizzle olive oil.
  7. Place the remaining garlic cloves and rosemary sprigs on top.
  8. Cover well with foil and stick the whole tray into the screaming hot oven.
  9. As soon as the lamb goes in, turn the temperature down to 170°C.
  10. Let it roast for 4 hours, while you watch soccer and salivate.

What to have it with:

Serve with a potato smash, greens, an optional mushroom sauce, and most importantly, a berry or currant jam.

There’s something absolutely magical about having an ultra-tender roast with a jam. I don’t know about you, but it knocked my socks off.


Rosemary’s Chicken

I was at the market a couple of days back and came home with a pot of my favourite herb – rosemary.

Isn’t she lovely? (:

I had to test her powers quick. So, wielding a tiny pair of scissors, I snipped off two sprigs. Immediately, there was a whiff of a beautiful virgin blue fragrance. I smiled, before hurrying to the kitchen to whip up some good old roast.

Tray-Roasted Chicken

Chop up some potatoes, and boil them for a while, with a slice of lemon.

Stick a tray into the oven and preheat it to 180°C. While that’s in there, slice a tomato (or use a stalk of cherry tomatoes), and smash a couple of cloves of garlic, leaving the skin on. Then, run the sprigs of rosemary under hot water for a few seconds. Apparently, doing this helps herbs work their magic better.

Prepare your chicken portions and take a deep breath. By now, the aroma of sweet citric goodness should have filled your kitchen.

Smile.

Once the oven’s almost ready, drain your potatoes and let them steam dry. This way, you’ll have crispier roasted potatoes.

Get the tray out of the oven. Stick the chicken parts in, together with the garlic, tomatoes and rosemary. Toss the potatoes in, and squeeze whatever juice is left of that lemon into the tray as well. Then, the lemon goes into the tray too, not the bin.

Sprinkle with salt and pepper, drizzle olive oil and give it all a splash of white wine. Chuck it back in to the oven; the middle tray for about an hour or so. At the halfway mark, take the dish out and splash in a little more wine. Then, using a spoon or ladle, douse everything in the tray with its own juices, before sending it back into the heat.

When the timer goes off, your dish should look something like this.

It was so good, I wound up finishing everything myself. :D