Tag Archives: Sauce

World’s Richest Seafood Cream Sauce

It’s a bold claim there but check this out:

    1. Render bacon fat out with butter. Fry bacon.
    2. Welcome the Aroma Fairies.
    3. Add seafood and let it fry about in the bacon fat for a bit.
    4. Poach seafood by adding white wine.
    5. Boil away till alcohol has burned off.
    6. (If you want heart-palpitations) Add full fat milk and bring to a boil.
    7. (If you want a cardia arrest) Crack in a beaten egg.
    8. Then add cream, and reduce the sauce.
    9. Season accordingly, with salt and pepper.
    10. Have it with angel-shaped pasta, because it’s the world’s tastiest.

It’s so rich I nearly lost my voice after dinner.

Okay, I exaggerate.

But only slightly.

Anyway, try it today.

I dare you.

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Hollandaise Sauce

I’ve always been wanting to make Hollandaise Sauce since I heard about it about say, four years ago. But there’d been no motivation nor inspiration all these days, right up till last week. Sarah got me Julia Child’s book Mastering the Art of French Cooking for Christmas and yes, in there was the recipe for the famous Hollandaise sauce. (If you don’t already own this book, get it at once. It will change your life.)

For a first attempt, I wouldn’t say making the sauce was an easy task, even though the stipulated cooking time in the book was five minutes. I took twenty. I don’t remember tasting Hollandaise sauce ever so there was no mental end product in mind, no idea what I was aiming at, although I do think it was a lovely job done nonetheless.

Hollandaise sauce is basically but not simply, a sauce made from egg yolk, beaten continuously over low heat until creamy before beaten further with lemon, and a chunk load of butter. It’s a painstaking process and technically challenging, but oh so rewarding when your palette meets with a rich creamy luxurious artery-clogging Hollandaise sauce. I won’t go into the details of how to make it here, because I’m sure you’d find excellent ones online and elsewhere.

You’d see Hollandaise sauce in Eggs Benedict, traditionally done as poached egg on ham or bacon on an English muffin, with a generous drizzle of the sauce.

Extremely extravagant, yet superbly satisfying.


Fish Spaghetti in Cream Sauce

Alright, so maybe it’s not really cream. But it’s pretty close I reckon, and less heartstopping, I think.

  1. Get your quick-cook spaghetti boiling together with the chopped carrots in a pot on the hob.
  2. In a skillet on medium low heat, melt a hunk of butter, then add in a splash of wine, a squeeze of lemon, a small amount of garlic puree and a thin slice of ginger. Crack in some salt and pepper too. Make sure you’ve got enough liquid to baste the fish.
  3. Once everything has combined, remove the slice of ginger, it has done its job.
  4. Make sure the fillet of fish has been pat dry, gently place it in the pan and baste it away on medium heat.
  5. Remove as soon as the fish is cooked. Take care not overdo it.
  6. Drain your spaghetti if it’s done.
  7. With the remaining butter and fish liquid rendered, add equal volumes of milk and flour. TIP! Usually, I add the milk to determine the amount of sauce I want, then add a little more milk, before adding flour in small quantities till the desired consistency.
  8. Taste the sauce and adjust the seasoning accordingly. Squeeze more lemon juice if necessary.
  9. Serve the sauce drizzled over the fish and spaghetti.

Vinegar Braised Haddock

I got tired of having fish and potatoes every Friday, so I made a little asian fish stew last night. Mummy used to make it for dinner some Fridays, before we succumbed to the convenience of dining out on the night before the weekend. It’s pleasantly bold, yet ever-so-slightly sour. Braised slowly but surely, in a mildly sweet garlicky dark sauce, the fish sings beautifully with the shrimps. The tomatoes, mushrooms and spinach leaves tosses up a party of textures. Chowed down with extra hot finger chilli and freshly steamed basmati.

  • 1 fillet haddock, defrosted completely, cut into large chunks
  • 1 tomato, cut into wedges
  • 1 brown mushroom, sliced
  • 1 white mushroom, sliced
  • 1 handful shrimps
  • 2 slices ginger
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 3 tablespoon black vinegar
  • 2 tablespoon light soy sauce
  • 2 teaspoon dark soy sauce
  • 1 pinch sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon sesame oil
  • 1/2  mug water
  • sea salt, to taste
  • 1 handful baby spinach leaves

 •••

  1. Get the sauce done first. With a little oil in the pan, in goes the garlic and ginger.
  2. When fragrant, get the shrimps, tomatoes and mushrooms in.
  3. Then, the vinegar, soy sauces, sugar and sesame oil.
  4. Add water to add more volume to sauce. Adjust with sea salt accordingly.
  5. Finally, when the sauce has reduced slightly, turn the heat down to s simmer and sit the fish pieces gently inside. Baste it well, and flip carefully when it’s half cooked.
  6. Once the fish is done, turn off the heat.
  7. Serve atop the baby spinach leaves.

No points for presentation there, but all smiles for the flavour.


Pizza Saucery

 

Tried out making your own pizza dough yet? Here’s how you can make your own Pizza Sauce now. Yes, that tomatoey first layer that goes onto your perfectly round and flat pizza dough. Instead of buying a jar off the shelf at the store, here’s a really good cheat. It’s actually Spaghetti Bolognese without the spaghetti and chopped up ingredients. Just the sauce alone. Combine a lug of olive oil, tomato puree, basil, pepper and water into a bowl and mix. Add water bit by bit till you get the consistency of a spread. You don’t want it too paste-like nor too runny.

So simple to do, it doesn’t even take a minute.


Samsui Labour

It’s Labour Day and the Samsui Women of historical Singapore came to mind. Here’s a little explanation from Wikipedia:

“The term Samsui Women broadly refers to a group of Chinese immigrants who came to Singapore between the 1920s and the 1940s in search of construction and industrial jobs. Their hard work contributed to Singapore’s development, both as a colony and as a nation.

Photo Courtesy of Wan Oligarchy

The Samsui Women came from Sanshui of Guangdong (Canton) Province in China, in addition to Shunde and Dongguan. Most Samsui Women are Cantonese (90%) but there are Hakka (10%) as well.

In Chinese, these women are referred to as 紅頭巾 (红头巾 in Simplified Chinese), which translates as “red bandana”, a reference to the trademark red cloth hats that they wore.

Coming to Singapore as cheap labourers, Samsui Women worked mainly in the construction industry and other industries that required hard labour. They also worked as domestic servants. They had a reputation of rejecting jobs involving drug (particularly opium) peddling, prostitution, or other vices, even if that meant they sometimes had to live in poverty.”

According to Soup Restaurant, Singapore, the Samsui Ginger Chicken is a ‘traditional Samsui dish consumed by the Samsui Women in Chinatown. Due to their low income, the Samsui Ginger Chicken was only consumed once a year, during the Chinese New Year. Chicken, steamed without much seasoning is dipped in fragrant ginger sauce before consumption.’

Here’s how make your own Samsui Ginger Chicken:

Salt the chicken slightly two hours before steaming. And once thoroughly cooked, submerge completely and immediately in ice cold water. This stops the cooking process and keeps the meat taut.

For the ginger sauce, it’s a mixture of old and young ginger, chicken or vegetable oil, sesame oil, and salt, (plus a bit of garlic too). I can’t list the proportions of ingredients because I’m not sure myself. Trial and error is the way to go till you get it right.

Serve with lettuce and cucumber. Remember our Samsui Women.