Tag Archives: Snack

Scrambled Eggs

Scrambled Eggs.

Awesome Breakfast.

Everybody’s Favourite.

Ramblings:

  • 2 eggs, cracked in a bowl, unbeaten
  • ¼ mug of milk
  • small knob of butter
  • small handful of finely grated cheddar
  • pinch of dried oregano
  • freshly ground sea salt and black pepper, to taste

Scrambling:

  1. Everybody’s got their own method of scrambling eggs but here’s how I like mine done:
  2. A small knob of butter goes in on a skillet, on high heat.
  3. Once the butter melts, put in the eggs and turn down the heat to low.
  4. Using a spatula, break the yolks and scramble the eggs erratically.
  5. Add the milk, cheese and oregano. Stir about till done.
  6. Season with salt and pepper accordingly.

I like my scrambled eggs with chunks of white and yellow, as opposed to having everything mixed thoroughly into a single colour. Then again, do it any way you like.

The scramble for scrambled eggs ends here. Hah.

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Couscous, Cheat

This is a great lazy cheat for awesome slurpy food when you’ve got some soup leftovers. (Note: This only works for clear soups, mostly the Asian sort. And of course, minestrone soup.)

I know I’ve sorta made a post about this before but hey, this is specifically for Coucous in Chinese Chicken Soup. You might say it’s a level up from Couscous, Stocked.

  1. Get your chicken soup leftover into a bowl and chuck it into the microwave for 2 minutes.
  2. Yes, that’s TWO minutes on high heat; you want it piping hot.
  3. And then in goes the couscous, right into the blistering hot bowl of soup. TIP! The ratio for this a little tricky. But basically, you need enough liquid to cover the coucous. Since you’re doing the reverse i.e. adding couscous to liquid, add the grains just so that there’s still enough water to cover the coucous. In this case, it’s okay to put less than more. (When the couscous is done, the grains would have been completely swollen with tasty goodness.)
  4. Cover with a plate or lid for 5-7 minutes.
  5. Have it hot, like you would with chunky soup.

Lush.

Photography: Sarah Lee


Yorkshire Paradise

It’s tragic how I had my first Yorkshire Pudding only when I came to London some months back. It was about the size of my palm, and carried a scoopful of lovely roast beef, white onions and gravy. Definitely love at first bite. I always thought they were difficult to make until I came across Jamie’s Oliver’s Mini Yorkies recipe. Literally, a piece of cake.

Long story short, the versatile Yorkshire Puddings or Mini Yorkies: with a couple of tweaks, and some true advice from Yorkshireman Niall, here’s how I like mine done:

  • 1 large egg
  • half a mug of plain flour
  • half a mug of fresh milk
  1. Into a shallow 12-hole muffin tray, liberally drizzle olive oil in one swift motion, from hole to hole without stopping. Stick into the oven and preheat to 180°C on the top rack. While that’s in there, prepare your pudding mix. It’s real similar to pancakes, so pay attention.
  2. Get the ingredients in a big bowl and mix away, till smooth.
  3. When the oil’s all hot (and maybe bubbly), get the tray out. Then, with the pudding mix, fill each hole to about half, give or take. At this stage, you’d be horrified to see the rings of oil surrounding the pudding mixture. Don’t worry, it beats using butter, hands down. (The amount should be just about right for 12 holes. Work out everything else in between.) Don’t take too long or the tray will cool down. Chuck it back into the oven for about 15 minutes.
  4. In the meantime, you can prepare a beef gravy or whatever you fancy in a yorkshire pudding. Personally, I think yorkies were created to caress beef.
  5. Keep an eye on them yorkies and you’ll see that they rise beautifully at the sides first, forming a little well of goodness. Done till golden. Brilliant. It’s plain physics, or so Sarah explains. If you forget to preheat the tray and oil till hot, the sides won’t rise.

This is what you’ll get:

I had this with a pork belly stew. More on that here.

******

A coupla months back, here’s how I had them:

After I’d gotten them out of the oven and out of the tray, this is what I stuck into each hole, and back into the heat:

  • a slice of tomato, as the base.
  • beef mince, marinated the way I like, with thyme and sage.
  • half rings of white onion.
  • cheddar, as the ‘glue’.

When the toppings were ready, on a chopping board, I plopped them onto the individual yorkies. Then, top off finally with a couple of leaves of arugula and a sprinkle of paprika.

With a snack looking this delish, you’d be a fool not to smile. (:


Sandwich: Toasted Fishcakes

Back when Mummy made breakfast for me to bring to school, I’d always be pleasantly surprised whenever it was toasted fishcake sandwiches. Even though she made it every Friday.

This concept of ‘fishcakes’ is really quite unique to Singapore. For some reason, it’s extremely difficult to find it even in other parts of Asia, not to mention Europe. Back in London, I’d only find it in Chinatown; what a tragedy.

In any case, if and when you get your hands on some ‘fishcake’, please treat yourself to a morning toasted fishcake sandwich. It will complete your day (and your life).

  • 1 piece of fishcake, halved and toasted
  • 2 slices of bread, white or wholemeal
  • 1 thumbsized knob of butter, halved

With a knob of butter and a hot toasty piece of fishcake wedged in each slice of bread, you’ve got one more thing to make your Friday brighter.

 


Express Chicken Dippers

I’ve been crazy busy with packing these past few days. It’s the summer and I’m moving, that’s why. So here’s how I’ve been satisfying my fried chicken cravings.

With a pack of battered chicken dippers that I got from Iceland, your friendly neighbourhood frozen food store, I managed to get these babies crispy without having to heat up an entire oven. I don’t even know why I didn’t wanna use the oven but here’s an alternative to the traditional stick-it-in-the-oven trick.

Express Chicken Dippers

  1. Straight from the freezer and into a wok on the hob, toss the dippers in frozen.
  2. Turn up the heat to full whack. Put a lid on. TIP! Doing this keeps the moisture in, steaming the dippers.
  3. After a couple of minutes, get them out and chop them into bite-size pieces. (There is no need to perform this step; I have an obsession with cutting my food into bite-size pieces.)
  4. Flip them about every couple of minutes.
  5. Get them out once they start to brown.
  6. Let them cool a little before chowing down, you don’t wanna burn your tongue, like me.
Or, you can always just use the oven.

Bacon-Wrapped Chicken Fillets

If you haven’t heard or seen this before, you must absolutely try it out sometime. Bacon-Wrapped Chicken Fillets will knock your socks off.

Depending on how many you’d like to make, this is what you’ll need for just a humble TWO pieces. But you know you’ll definitely want more.

Two ingredients, two simple steps, for two awesome chunks of meaty goodness.

  • 2 streaks of smoked bacon or pancetta.
  • 2 fillets of chicken, cut into pieces two inches long
  1. Put a piece of chicken on one end of a streak of bacon and roll it to the other end.
  2. Stick it into the top rack of the oven at 180°C for about 20 minutes, flipping it at midpoint.
TIP! If you wanna be a tad more adventurous, sprinkle a dash of thyme, rosemary or basil across each streak of bacon before rolling.
Also, this goes fantastic with a potato mash and gravy. More on that next time.

Simplest Salad Dressing

It was not till I got to London last year that I started appreciating salad, especially when it’s been tossed pretty in glistening dressing. Here are the guidelines to making the Simplest Salad Dressing.

You’ll need a clear jar; something like this:

With this, you can see how much liquid you’re pouring in. Also, you’ll be able to tell what it is without having to open the jar.

Next, componentsOlive oil, sour acid, salt and pepper.

The key is noting the ratio of olive oil to sour acid = 3 : 1.  That is, 3 parts oil to 1 part sour acid, which can take any form, from balsamic vinegar to lemon or lime juice. Experiment with different kinds to discover which goes best with your salad. Don’t forget that pinch of salt and pepper for added flavour.

And remember, salads don’t have to be boring.